Democracy’s defenders can’t just win elections. They must also campaign to save democracy.

Model: For the first time in US history, a party must mount two parallel presidential campaigns: one to win the election, and the other to prevent its theft.
Scope: Democrats will spend at least $1B on the campaign to reelect President Biden. They and other pro-democracy actors must also mount a campaign of similar size, scope, and seriousness to stop the coup plotters.
Leadership: The political job of the President and the Biden-Harris team is to win re-election. For the parallel campaign, we need the most influential democratic voices in politics (of both parties) to come together.

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How to make the Supreme Court confirmation process meaningful

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If senators hope to restore any sense of dignity to the process, they should avoid trying to establish where the nominee stands on hot-button political issues and focus instead on the larger picture: Will this person restore some measure of confidence in the Supreme Court? If we can incentivize nominees to act more like judges and less like partisan team players, there may still be hope for the judiciary.

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This is not how the Supreme Court is supposed to work

So why are those who admire Breyer the most cheering the loudest? Because President Biden, with his bare majority in the Senate, will be able to name a replacement who might prevent the further diminution of the court’s stature.

Think how bizarre that is. We take for granted in our cynical political environment that Democrats will react to news of Breyer’s retirement with relief — or even joy. But this actually highlights the degree to which the Supreme Court has lost credibility and has ceased to function as an impartial interpreter of the law.

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The West may not be able to deter Putin. But at least he knows the consequences will be devastating.

Nevertheless, Putin will understand that taking this step would reenergize Western alliance and leave his country an economic basket case and an international pariah.

In a background call with reporters on Tuesday, senior White House officials vowed that, should Russia advance into Ukraine, “the gradualism of the past is out, and this time we’ll start at the top of the escalation ladder and stay there.

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Ask Jennifer Rubin about her columns, politics, policy and more

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Recent Reader Q&As: Is Biden back? Eugene Robinson answered your questions. | Who likes turkey anyway? Alexandra Petri answered your questions. | Where’s Kamala Harris? Jennifer Rubin answered your questions.
Submit a question for our weekly Q&As: Alexandra Petri (Tuesdays at 11 a.m. ET) | Eugene Robinson (Tuesdays at 1 p.m. ET) | Jennifer Rubin (Fridays at 12 p.m. ET.)
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A sobering, new report shows how much work is needed to protect democracy

Protect Democracy notes that efforts at the federal level, including in the compromise Freedom to Vote Act, must be coupled with lobbying, legal challenges and public education at the state level.

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The effort to prevent delegitimization of elections also requires the debunking and challenging of phony elections “audits,” such as the one conducted in Maricopa County, Ariz. (which turned out to confirm President Biden’s victory).

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Biden is changing how he’s talking about his agenda. It’s overdue.

So, on the one hand, we’re facing new disruptions to our supplies. But at the same time, we’re also experiencing higher demand for goods because wages are up, as well as — as well as people have money in the bank. And because of the strength of our economic recovery, American families have been able to buy more products.
And — but guess what? They’re not going out to dinner and lunch and going to the local bars because of covid. So what are they doing? They’re staying home, they’re ordering online, and they’re buying product.

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Tough sentences for Jan. 6 rioters should freak Trump out

His sentence certainly stands out from those previously handed down. The Post reports: “Of the 126 people who have pleaded guilty so far, only 16 have admitted to felonies, and Fairlamb is the third felon to be sentenced. The other two felons, who were not accused of violence against the police, received sentences of eight and 14 months.”

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That punishment could have serious repercussions on various fronts, including for leadership at the Justice Department.

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Where’s Kamala Harris? Jennifer Rubin answered your questions.

Reader Q&As with Opinions columnists
Recent Q&As: Is Biden back? Eugene Robinson answered your questions. | Who likes turkey anyway? Alexandra Petri answered your questions. | Where’s Kamala Harris? Jennifer Rubin answered your questions.
Submit a question for our weekly Q&As: Alexandra Petri (Tuesdays at 11 a.m. ET) | Eugene Robinson (Tuesdays at 1 p.m. ET) | Jennifer Rubin (Fridays at 12 p.m. ET)
Submit a question for upcoming special Q&As: How far should Democrats go to appease White voters? Ask Perry Bacon. (Nov. 15 at 1 p.m. ET) | How can we celebrate the holidays safely? Dr. Leana S.

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