Editorial: Please Supreme Court, do not take abortion rights away from any women, anywhere

Consider the array of civil and human rights protected by Supreme Court landmark rulings in the last century: Public schools cannot be racially segregated. A person of one race has the right to marry someone of another race. A person has the right to marry someone of the same sex. And a woman has a right to a legal abortion.
Today, all but one of those landmark rulings are accepted and undisputed precedents. Only the right to an abortion, established by a Supreme Court ruling in Roe vs. Wade in 1973, has fueled intense resistance.

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Editorial: Colleges’ overreliance on adjunct faculty is bad for students, instructors and academic freedom

The era of college courses taught mostly by tenured professors, who spend time on research and scholarly pursuits in addition to teaching, has been fading fast. Increasingly, the work of instructing students now rests with lecturers or adjuncts — non-tenure-track faculty, almost always working part time for less money and with almost no job security.

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Editorial: Are Americans the Thanksgiving dinner guests, or the hosts? Both, of course

Thanksgiving celebrations are often homecomings, with the grown-up kids returning to the nest with their own children in tow, for dinner or the whole long weekend. Or maybe a cousin’s house or a close friend’s is designated as headquarters for the ritual feast and as home base from which Black Friday excursions are planned and college football games are enjoyed. So who is the host and who is the guest? There’s not always a clear line.
If it’s your house, you’re pretty sure you’re the host.

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Editorial: Another COVID Thanksgiving — sigh

Remember how depressing it was in late November 2020? Even after six months of living with strict stay-at-home orders, COVID-19 still lurked unseen in every corner of the world.
The few treatments for infection were unproved or ineffective, and the terrible winter surge of infections was just beginning. Health officials pleaded with Americans to nix the traditional Thanksgiving feast with friends and family — or at the very least, to celebrate outside — and many people did just that, with the hope that doing so would ensure a future of healthy holidays.

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Editorial: L.A. tripped over its duty to fix the city’s broken sidewalks

Sidewalks are essential transportation infrastructure in dense, urban Los Angeles, but thousands of miles of walkways are broken, cracked and dangerous. At the current level of funding and with fixes delayed by inefficient repair policies, Angelenos may have to wait centuries for safe, smooth sidewalks, according to a recent audit.
That’s unacceptable.
Sidewalks are crucial to community livability. Broken sidewalks make it dangerous for the average pedestrian to simply walk down the street, and make travel nearly impossible for the disabled.

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Editorial: Supply chain issues affect almost everything, but surge in port pollution threatens our lungs

Supply chain problems have caused a massive backlog of diesel-spewing cargo ships outside the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach and disrupted the movement of goods across the nation. But the logjam has also brought an explosion in health-damaging air pollution.
The California Air Resources Board estimates that ships alone are pumping an additional 20 tons of smog-forming nitrogen oxides into the air each day — the equivalent of adding 5.8 million passenger cars to the region — while adding as much lung-damaging diesel particulate matter as nearly 100,000 big rig trucks.

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Editorial: California lawmakers wine and dine with lobbyists in Maui. Why is this legal?

A dozen state lawmakers are in Maui this week for one of the most unsavory traditions in California politics: a five-day stay at a luxury resort where, far from their constituents and the pesky political press corps, legislators rub shoulders with lobbyists and corporate executives in a tropical playland.
Poolside drinks, golf rounds and snorkeling excursions aren’t the only way they pass their time at this annual conference. They also talk about policy.

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Editorial: Glasgow climate summit brought incremental progress. That’s a failure

The U.N. summit in Glasgow concluded over the weekend with a new climate agreement among nearly 200 countries that drew applause from world leaders in attendance.
But they should be embarrassed patting themselves on the back over something so inadequate. The two-week proceeding brought incremental progress, but that in itself is a colossal failure.
We need bold and swift action to avert a catastrophic rise in global temperatures, but got mostly timid compromises, far-off pledges and watered-down commitments.

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Editorial: Biden makes a trillion-dollar investment in America’s future

Finally, “Infrastructure Week” is no longer a punchline. As President Biden signed the $1.2-trillion bill into law Monday, he kicked off the biggest spending program in more than a decade to build and rebuild the nation’s essential infrastructure.
Over the coming years, the U.S. will significantly ramp up construction related to roads, bridges, water systems, broadband, ports and the power grid. These are the kinds of bread-and-butter government projects that are vital for the nation’s safety, well-being and economic strength.

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Editorial: How can kids learn without homework and rigid deadlines? Quite well, it turns out

The usual system for grading students is, bit by bit, going by the wayside in favor of one that emphasizes learning over traditional measures. It’s a healthy shift, though traditionalists no doubt are raising their eyebrows and muttering darkly about lowered standards and kids skating through school. The skepticism is especially likely now that the changes are being hastened by the realization that the current system puts students of color and those from lower-income households at a distinct disadvantage.

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