Editorial: L.A. Unified shouldn’t be the loser in a game of vaccine-mandate chicken

In the game of chicken with vaccine-hesitant parents, L.A. schools are the losers. The Los Angeles Unified School District gave parents of kids 12 and older an ultimatum to get their kids fully vaccinated against COVID-19 by the start of the second semester in January; more than 30,000 students said, “And who’s gonna make me?”
All bets are on the school board backing down Tuesday and putting off the vaccine mandate to the fall of 2022, the beginning of the next school year, seven months after the original deadline.

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Editorial: Don’t take self-determination from the mentally ill

County governments inherited much of the state’s responsibility for mental healthcare several decades ago but have seldom been up to the task. Often this is because of inadequate funding, but counties also argue that state laws prevent them from serving people in need.
Much ire has been directed at the Lanterman-Petris-Short Act, signed into law in 1967 by Gov. Ronald Reagan to provide for treatment of people unable to see to their own needs, while ensuring that they retain their right to self-determination to the greatest extent possible.

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Editorial: Legalize street food. L.A.’s iconic sidewalk vendors are still being penalized

Street vending may be legal in California, but for the vendors selling sliced fruit, tacos and other food items it’s nearly impossible to get a permit to operate without fear of penalty, particularly in Los Angeles County.
Why? Because state and county public health regulations for selling food from a street cart remain so complicated, impractical and expensive that the vast majority of vendors have not — and cannot — get permitted.

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Editorial: How to get our sad and anxious kids from traumatized to OK

It was easy to see that COVID-19 represented a crisis of huge proportions prompting extraordinary measures to protect public health.
Less easily perceived is how the pandemic rocked the mental health of children who endured more than a year of remote schooling and social isolation, while grappling with fears of this deadly and unprecedented virus. But they are suffering, and many teachers and parents could tell you that without conducting a study. Some California school districts have reported that absenteeism has surged.

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Editorial: Fix Justice Department oversight to protect democracy

In the post-Watergate era, Congress shored up the integrity and transparency of the executive branch by creating inspector general offices and charging them to ferret out misconduct and abuse and report it to the public. The offices were correctly deemed an essential supplement to the traditional checks and balances engrafted by the founders into American democracy, in that they could bring to light abuses that the president or his appointees might otherwise cover up.
The U.S.

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Editorial: Californians need more transparency over school district salaries

For the last several years, California’s cities and counties have been required to send their payroll information to the state controller, who posts it on a public website. Such transparency helps Californians keep up with how local governments spend tax dollars on salaries and benefits — an important metric, as employee compensation constitutes the bulk of spending by most government agencies.

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Editorial: Sentencing Aung San Suu Kyi to prison is just one more turn on Myanmar’s spiral downward

In the last decade, Aung San Suu Kyi has gone from being one of the most prominent symbols of democracy in the world to being one of the most rebuked.
Her father, the founder of Myanmar’s military, became a politician and activist who devoted himself to the effort to win independence from Britain but was assassinated before he could see that achieved. Suu Kyi studied in India and England before returning to Myanmar and becoming involved in the democracy movement and rising in its leadership, co-founding the National League for Democracy party.

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Editorial: Don’t slash incentives for California rooftop solar

It’s no accident that California is a solar energy leader. One big reason is a state incentive program that has turned about 10,000 rooftop solar installations 25 years ago into more than 1.2 million today.
Small arrays of panels on homes, businesses and other buildings now account for about 11% of the state’s electricity production capacity. Their proliferation is a cornerstone of the state’s efforts to combat climate change, phase out the burning of fossil fuels and get 100% of its electricity from renewable sources by 2045.
So it’s a bit of a head scratcher why Gov.

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Editorial: LAPD gun scandal has the faint smell of Rampart

Although the Los Angeles Police Department has had many dark chapters, the darkest was likely the Rampart corruption scandal of the 1990s, which began with one officer shooting a fellow officer dead. A resulting investigation uncovered a string of thefts, lies, attempted murder, and shocking mismanagement and lax oversight.
It was hard to see how the department could come back from that low point.

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