Tomi Lahren’s vanishing voter-fraud claim

Then came Election Day. With 78 percent of the vote counted, the “No” ballots — rejecting the initiative to remove Newsom — were ahead of “Yes” ballots by about 2.6 million votes. News organizations had little trouble making an election-night call. Don’t the vote-fraudsters know that they don’t need to provide that big a margin?

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Given that Lahren got a bit of attention for her prediction — including scrutiny from CNN’s Brian Stelter on “Reliable Sources” — we figured she’d want to discuss it further.

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The crisis will get worse before it gets better. Are Democrats prepared?

Which is justified, since the pandemic is the defining event of our time. But Democrats should be equally forceful in describing to voters the true perils associated with the GOP’s ongoing abandonment of democracy.

That’s because numerous new developments indicate that our democratic crisis will get worse before it gets better. Are Democrats prepared to make a big argument to the country about this?

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Consider what’s currently happening in Pennsylvania.

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Do Democrats have what it takes to stand up to the pharmaceutical industry?

But it looks like the chance may be lost, all because of a few centrist Democrats who have decided that preserving pharmaceutical industry profits is absolutely vital.

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In a vote Wednesday in the House Energy and Commerce Committee, one of multiple committees handling this bill, three Democrats — Reps. Scott Peters (D-Calif.), Kathleen Rice (D-N.Y.) and Kurt Schrader (D-Ore.) — voted with Republicans to kill the provision that would allow price negotiation, preventing the measure from going forward.

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The right-wing media is helping Trump destroy democracy. A new poll shows how.

The poll’s big finding is that people who rely heavily on Fox News and other right-wing media are overwhelmingly more likely to believe the election was stolen from Trump — and are overwhelmingly less likely to blame Trump for the insurrection — than those who do not.

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In one sense, that’s a no-brainer.

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Cremation or composting? I’d consider the latter.

And now, in some states, people are opting to be composted rather than be embalmed or cremated.

Okay, let’s get it over with right now: Ewwwww.

Thus far, Colorado and Washington state have approved body composting, and Oregon is soon to follow. The idea is to allow the body to return to dust — or dirt — under controlled conditions, resulting in a few bags of sanitized soil that can be used for planting or distribution under qualified circumstances. (Imagine a flowering dogwood, or a perennial garden thanks to “Nana.

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Can Biden roll back the Reagan revolution?

They see it as a threat to everything they’ve accomplished over the last 40 years — a view articulated well by former Trump adviser Stephen Moore, who is leading an impromptu effort to stop the bill:

“We’re telling donors and other organizations this is ‘the war of the worlds’ for the conservative movement, because we have to stop this bill,” said Moore, who leads the Committee to Unleash Prosperity along with Art Laffer, the supply-side economist whom Trump awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

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A Texas Republican’s vile rant shows ‘great replacement’ is becoming GOP dogma

A particularly vile “great replacement” rant that Texas Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick (R) unleashed on Fox News opens a window on all of this.

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“The revolution has begun,” Patrick told host Laura Ingraham. Speaking about the president, Patrick added: “A silent revolution by the Democrat Party and Joe Biden to take over the country.”

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Patrick blasted the Biden administration for “allowing” in one or two million migrants this year.

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A scary court victory for Devin Nunes

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Here’s an example of a Lizza passage that irked Nunes: “Why would the Nuneses, Steve King, and an obscure dairy publication all conspire to hide the fact that the congressman’s family sold its farm and moved to Iowa?” (King was a Republican Iowa congressman at the time of the Esquire story.)

Iowa federal judge C.J. Williams looked over Nunes’s claims and tossed them in August 2020, writing that none of the allegedly problematic statements in the Lizza story “plausibly support a defamation claim.

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Facebook, Google and Twitter are the new ‘oligarchy of speech’

Such oddities are explored by Eugene Volokh in “What Cheap Speech Has Done: (Greater) Equality and Its Discontents” in the UC Davis Law Review. Volokh, law professor at UCLA, notes that the Internet, by making it possible for almost anyone to speak to many others, has radically reduced the importance of the “oligarchy of speech” that existed when large media entities acted as gatekeepers to the public forum.

Says Volokh, “Oligarchy, how quickly many have come to miss you!” Here are some reasons why.

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Facebook, Google and Twitter are the new ‘oligarchy of speech’

Such oddities are explored by Eugene Volokh in “What Cheap Speech Has Done: (Greater) Equality and Its Discontents” in the UC Davis Law Review. Volokh, law professor at UCLA, notes that the Internet, by making it possible for almost anyone to speak to many others, has radically reduced the importance of the “oligarchy of speech” that existed when large media entities acted as gatekeepers to the public forum.

Says Volokh, “Oligarchy, how quickly many have come to miss you!” Here are some reasons why.

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