Democracy’s defenders can’t just win elections. They must also campaign to save democracy.

Model: For the first time in US history, a party must mount two parallel presidential campaigns: one to win the election, and the other to prevent its theft.
Scope: Democrats will spend at least $1B on the campaign to reelect President Biden. They and other pro-democracy actors must also mount a campaign of similar size, scope, and seriousness to stop the coup plotters.
Leadership: The political job of the President and the Biden-Harris team is to win re-election. For the parallel campaign, we need the most influential democratic voices in politics (of both parties) to come together.

Read original

How to make the Supreme Court confirmation process meaningful

Story continues below advertisement

If senators hope to restore any sense of dignity to the process, they should avoid trying to establish where the nominee stands on hot-button political issues and focus instead on the larger picture: Will this person restore some measure of confidence in the Supreme Court? If we can incentivize nominees to act more like judges and less like partisan team players, there may still be hope for the judiciary.

Read original

This is not how the Supreme Court is supposed to work

So why are those who admire Breyer the most cheering the loudest? Because President Biden, with his bare majority in the Senate, will be able to name a replacement who might prevent the further diminution of the court’s stature.

Think how bizarre that is. We take for granted in our cynical political environment that Democrats will react to news of Breyer’s retirement with relief — or even joy. But this actually highlights the degree to which the Supreme Court has lost credibility and has ceased to function as an impartial interpreter of the law.

Read original

The West may not be able to deter Putin. But at least he knows the consequences will be devastating.

Nevertheless, Putin will understand that taking this step would reenergize Western alliance and leave his country an economic basket case and an international pariah.

In a background call with reporters on Tuesday, senior White House officials vowed that, should Russia advance into Ukraine, “the gradualism of the past is out, and this time we’ll start at the top of the escalation ladder and stay there.

Read original

Biden proposes saddling an already struggling Federal Reserve with two political activists

Cook is a Michigan State University professor whose peer-reviewed academic writings pertinent to monetary policy are, to be polite, thin. The White House noted that she “is on the Board of the Directors of the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.” She was put there two weeks before Biden proposed promoting her. But she strokes progressivism’s erogenous zones: She appears to favor racial reparations.

Read original

Putin faces plenty of obstacles as he tries to impose his will on Ukraine and the West

But Washington has also held out the offer of diplomacy, outlining ways that the United States and Russia can work out better confidence-building measures regarding security arrangements in Eastern Europe.

Last week, I outlined Russia’s interests and strengths in this crisis. It is vital to understand its weaknesses as well. “When Putin took Crimea in 2014, he lost Ukraine,” as Owen Matthews writes in a thought-provoking essay. After it declared independence in 1991, Ukraine was divided between an unabashedly pro-Russia segment of its population and a more nationalistic one.

Read original

Strong economic growth wrecks the GOP’s gloom-and-doom spin

That’s not just good; it’s positively spectacular, exceeding every forecast. It’s the highest GDP growth since 1984, which is remembered as a moment of boundless prosperity.

While predictions can always be wrong (and often are), the International Monetary Fund now forecasts that growth will slow to 4 percent in 2022 — which would still be the highest growth in two decades, excepting 2021.

Story continues below advertisement

Then there’s the jobs picture: In 2021, more than 6 million jobs were created, the largest number of any year on record.

Read original

Strong economic growth wrecks the GOP’s gloom-and-doom spin

That’s not just good; it’s positively spectacular, exceeding every forecast. It’s the highest GDP growth since 1984, which is remembered as a moment of boundless prosperity.

While predictions can always be wrong (and often are), the International Monetary Fund now forecasts that growth will slow to 4 percent in 2022 — which would still be the highest growth in two decades, excepting 2021.

Story continues below advertisement

Then there’s the jobs picture: In 2021, more than 6 million jobs were created, the largest number of any year on record.

Read original

Strong economic growth wrecks the GOP’s gloom-and-doom spin

That’s not just good; it’s positively spectacular, exceeding every forecast. It’s the highest GDP growth since 1984, which is remembered as a moment of boundless prosperity.

While predictions can always be wrong (and often are), the International Monetary Fund now forecasts that growth will slow to 4 percent in 2022 — which would still be the highest growth in two decades, excepting 2021.

Story continues below advertisement

Then there’s the jobs picture: In 2021, more than 6 million jobs were created, the largest number of any year on record.

Read original