Management by Metrics Is Upending Newsrooms and Killing Journalism

Journalism is in crisis. The past two decades have seen tens of thousands of newspaper jobs vanish and hundreds of communities become news deserts. Run-amok commercialism continues to hollow out and distort our news media in increasingly dangerous ways. Yet, despite such worrying signs, the precise contours of these structural transformations often escape scrutiny, and it’s often unclear what’s truly new. After all, profit-driven media have always underserved and misrepresented large segments of society along socioeconomic divides.

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The Anti-Politics and Anti-Comedy of Norm Macdonald

When Norm Macdonald passed away last month at the age of sixty-one, most major outlets ran obituaries praising his long career in comedy. Many of us were reminded how funny Macdonald was and took to YouTube to dip into the deep reservoir of his material.
Notable figures of the online right did the very same thing, some of them claiming Norm Macdonald as one of their own. While they may have overstated their case, it can nonetheless be difficult to square appreciation for Macdonald’s comedy with his ambiguously conservative politics.

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Refugees in Melbourne Are Stuck in a Nightmare of Indefinite Detention and COVID-19 Infections

In the last week, nineteen refugees being held indefinitely by the Australian government at the Park Hotel in Melbourne have tested positive for COVID-19. Eight of the forty-three refugees in detention are, as of Friday, still awaiting their results. Two detainees have been hospitalized by the virus, and according to a statement made in Parliament by Greens senator Nick McKim, one was so ill that he needed an ambulance.
These refugees were brought to Australia from Nauru under the short-lived Medevac Bill passed in early 2019.

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Refugees in Melbourne Are Stuck in a Nightmare of Indefinite Detention and COVID-19 Infections

In the last week, nineteen refugees being held indefinitely by the Australian government at the Park Hotel in Melbourne have tested positive for COVID-19. Eight of the forty-three refugees in detention are, as of Friday, still awaiting their results. Two detainees have been hospitalized by the virus, and according to a statement made in Parliament by Greens senator Nick McKim, one was so ill that he needed an ambulance.
These refugees were brought to Australia from Nauru under the short-lived Medevac Bill passed in early 2019.

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The Right Is Embracing the Reactionary Brutality of “Special Operators” Like Eddie Gallagher

Special operators in elite military units are the tip of the spear of US counterinsurgency campaigns around the globe. Their exploits in Iraq, Afghanistan, and other fronts in the global “war on terror” have become fodder for scores of action films like American Sniper, fanboy books by journalists covering the military, and tell-all memoirs by SEAL Team 6 members involved in the rubout of Osama bin Laden and other targets.

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Don’t Give in to the Culture Industry’s Appeals to Nostalgia

In the midst of accelerating crises, the past can offer a comforting retreat. Over the last year, we’ve not only been living through a global pandemic unlike any we’ve seen in generations, but the effects of climate change have become even clearer, and the economy once again threw people into turmoil as industries were disrupted and housing costs continued to soar. Faced with the stress and anxiety of events far beyond our personal control, hope for the future can retreat, leaving nostalgia to fill the void.

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New York’s Future: Cuomoism Without Cuomo?

Kathy Hochul, the new governor of New York, has made it clear she wants to make a clean break from the Andrew Cuomo years and shore up her reelection prospects. The former lieutenant governor to the disgraced Cuomo, Hochul has purged numerous holdovers from his administration and made a few concrete policy changes, including announcing the correct number of coronavirus deaths and speeding up the release of funds for rental relief.

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The Job Market Is Far From Recovered

Between February and April 2020, the US economy lost over 22 million jobs, almost 15 percent of total employment. That was by far the largest job loss since the early years of the Great Depression. Between 1929 and 1932 or 1933 (depending on whose numbers you use, since there are no solid, official stats), 20 to 25 percent of jobs disappeared (again, depending on whose numbers you use). Since World War II, however, the worst contraction, the Great Recession of 2008–9, killed just over 6 percent of all jobs — a big number, but well short of 15 percent.

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Kyrsten Sinema Didn’t Always Oppose Taxing the Rich

Senator Kyrsten Sinema (D-AZ) is attempting to single-handedly block Democrats from paring back Donald Trump’s tax cuts for the wealthy and corporations to fund their health care, climate, and anti-poverty reconciliation bill — even though she voted against those Trump tax cuts in the House and then campaigned against them during her Senate bid.
Politico reported Wednesday that “Sinema remains opposed to one of the party’s chief goals of raising tax rates on high-income earners and corporations,” adding that this “increasingly appears like a red line” for the senator.

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Democrats Are About to Massively Spike Childcare Prices for Working-Class Families

Trying to run a childcare system using market prices runs into three main problems.

The wages for childcare providers wind up very low.
The costs for parents wind up very high.
Paying the costs out of pocket requires families to undergo major drops in their standard of living when they have a child and creates asymmetries between identical families with different numbers of children.

For a government, solving these problems is pretty simple.

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