The Fight for Italian Reunification Inspired the International Left

On November 27, 1871, Italy’s King Vittorio Emanuele II gave an impassioned speech at the Italian parliament, finally ushering in the complete unification of his country. For centuries, the peninsula had been divided into a patchwork of regions, mostly dominated by the monarchies of Austria, France, and Spain. Napoleon had worked to change this arrangement after the French Revolution, but, after Habsburg diplomat Count Klemens von Metternich’s reversal of his reforms at the Council of Vienna in 1815, the three foreign dynasties largely regained their strongholds.

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Thanks for giving

OPINION:
For some, this Thanksgiving – like last year — is a more difficult occasion than previous ones. Perhaps a loved one has died from COVID-19, or you feel isolated from relatives and friends due to lockdowns, quarantines, travel restrictions, vaccinations (or not), masks and “distancing” and might think you have little to celebrate or be thankful for.
You might be struggling over what to do with an errant child or grandchild who ought to be thankful for what has been done for him or her but is headed down the wrong road.

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The Revolution of 2020: How Trump’s Big Lie reshaped history after 220 years

Image via Wikipedia.

There are few words as overused as “revolution,” which has many Merriam-Webster definitions and here means “a fundamental change in political organization.” While people who discuss politics are prone to dramatic talk of “revolutions,” few of the American presidential elections described that way really merit the term. Franklin D. Roosevelt’s “revolution” of 1932 changed the nature and role of government in American life, and Ronald Reagan’s election in 1980 undid at least some of those changes.

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This Thanksgiving, I’m Grateful for a President Who Believes in Science

President Joe Biden speaks about Covid-19 vaccinations, Thursday, October 7, 2021. (Susan Walsh / AP Photo)

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They were always going to come for Jefferson

It did not take a particularly prescient person to know that the Left’s iconoclasm wouldn’t stop with Confederate statues. Perhaps that’s why former President Donald Trump was able to predict back in 2017 that they would come for Thomas Jefferson and George Washington next.
He was right. This week, art handlers packed up a statue of Jefferson and carried it out of New York City Hall, where it had resided for nearly two centuries.

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They were always going to come for Jefferson

It did not take a particularly prescient person to know that the Left’s iconoclasm wouldn’t stop with Confederate statues. Perhaps that’s why former President Donald Trump was able to predict back in 2017 that they would come for Thomas Jefferson and George Washington next.
He was right. This week, art handlers packed up a statue of Jefferson and carried it out of New York City Hall, where it had resided for nearly two centuries.

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They were always going to come for Jefferson

It did not take a particularly prescient person to know that the Left’s iconoclasm wouldn’t stop with Confederate statues. Perhaps that’s why former President Donald Trump was able to predict back in 2017 that they would come for Thomas Jefferson and George Washington next.
He was right. This week, art handlers packed up a statue of Jefferson and carried it out of New York City Hall, where it had resided for nearly two centuries.

Read original

They were always going to come for Jefferson

It did not take a particularly prescient person to know that the Left’s iconoclasm wouldn’t stop with Confederate statues. Perhaps that’s why former President Donald Trump was able to predict back in 2017 that they would come for Thomas Jefferson and George Washington next.
He was right. This week, art handlers packed up a statue of Jefferson and carried it out of New York City Hall, where it had resided for nearly two centuries.

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Can a Vastly Bigger National-Service Program Bring the Country Back Together?

Linwood Holton, Jr., was not an obvious candidate to advance the cause of national reconciliation. He was a white son of the Old South, and grew up during the Great Depression, in Big Stone Gap, in the rural southwest corner of Virginia. His mother worked at home and his father ran a railroad that pulled coal out of the mountains.
During the Second World War, Holton served in the Navy in the Pacific, and, after he attended law school, he entered politics in Roanoke, where he gained a reputation for discomfort with racial segregation. After the Supreme Court’s 1954 ruling in Brown v.

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Trump’s allies think they can defy the Capitol attack panel. History suggests otherwise | Sidney Blumenthal

Trump’s allies think they can defy the Capitol attack panel. History suggests otherwise

In the infancy of the Confederacy, Congress formed a committee to investigate – and everyone cooperated

Steve Bannon has been indicted for contempt of Congress. Photograph: Mike Theiler/UPI/Rex/Shutterstock

Steve Bannon has been indicted for contempt of Congress.

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