No, ‘toxic masculinity’ does not define sports

In a Washington Post opinion piece , Boston University professor Joshua Pederson tries to cleanse himself of “failing at one of the basic tasks of parenthood” by declaring that toxic masculinity is central to organized sports.
It is Pederson himself who claims he worried that he was failing at parenthood because his 7-year-old son hated organized sports. To be clear, he was being far too harsh on himself: Some children just don’t enjoy athletic pursuits in the more structured environment of organized sports, with coaches and referees.

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No, ‘toxic masculinity’ does not define sports

In a Washington Post opinion piece , Boston University professor Joshua Pederson tries to cleanse himself of “failing at one of the basic tasks of parenthood” by declaring that toxic masculinity is central to organized sports.
It is Pederson himself who claims he worried that he was failing at parenthood because his 7-year-old son hated organized sports. To be clear, he was being far too harsh on himself: Some children just don’t enjoy athletic pursuits in the more structured environment of organized sports, with coaches and referees.

Read original

No, ‘toxic masculinity’ does not define sports

In a Washington Post opinion piece , Boston University professor Joshua Pederson tries to cleanse himself of “failing at one of the basic tasks of parenthood” by declaring that toxic masculinity is central to organized sports.
It is Pederson himself who claims he worried that he was failing at parenthood because his 7-year-old son hated organized sports. To be clear, he was being far too harsh on himself: Some children just don’t enjoy athletic pursuits in the more structured environment of organized sports, with coaches and referees.

Read original

Editorial: Serra’s statue in the U.S. Capitol should be replaced with someone who represents California today

For all the statues of Father Junípero Serra that have been removed from public places, one of the most prominent figures of him remains: a bronze statue of the chief architect of the California mission movement, holding a cross aloft, in the National Statuary Hall in the U.S. Capitol, where it has represented the state since 1931.
Each state is allowed to send two statues to the Capitol building, honoring esteemed residents of its past.

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Nearly 100 Confederate Monuments Were Toppled Last Year. What Happened to Them?

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This project was funded in part by the Pulitzer Center. 
It’s been a long time since I sat in an American history class, but what I remember of my education in Jacksonville, Florida, in the 1980s and ’90s is how much of it was not fact, but myth.
I was taught that the Civil War was fought over states’ rights—a concept that seemed plausibly defensible to a kid—and that “our side” had its own heroes and its own stories worth remembering.

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Kyrsten Sinema, John McCain, And The Bad Omens For Democrats’ Wildest Dreams

(Watch the video for a monologue on this article and an interview with The Washington Examiner’s Conn Carroll on exactly what’s not working for the Democrats — and what it means for the future.)
Imagine the following scenario: One political party holds the White House, the House of Representatives and — by a razor-thin margin — the U.S. Senate.
They have big plans: major, sweeping legislation. There’s a problem, though. Or to be precise, there are four problems.
First, the president is very unpopular; we’re talking mid-30-percent approval.

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Kyrsten Sinema, John McCain, And The Bad Omens For Democrats’ Wildest Dreams

(Watch the video for a monologue on this article and an interview with The Washington Examiner’s Conn Carroll on exactly what’s not working for the Democrats — and what it means for the future.)
Imagine the following scenario: One political party holds the White House, the House of Representatives and — by a razor-thin margin — the U.S. Senate.
They have big plans: major, sweeping legislation. There’s a problem, though. Or to be precise, there are four problems.
First, the president is very unpopular; we’re talking mid-30-percent approval.

Read original

Kyrsten Sinema, John McCain, And The Bad Omens For Democrats’ Wildest Dreams

(Watch the video for a monologue on this article and an interview with The Washington Examiner’s Conn Carroll on exactly what’s not working for the Democrats — and what it means for the future.)
Imagine the following scenario: One political party holds the White House, the House of Representatives and — by a razor-thin margin — the U.S. Senate.
They have big plans: major, sweeping legislation. There’s a problem, though. Or to be precise, there are four problems.
First, the president is very unpopular; we’re talking mid-30-percent approval.

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Tucker Carlson: Everyone at the White House has gone crazy

NEWYou can now listen to Fox News articles!
We have spent an awful lot of time telling you what we think about the Biden administration. We do it virtually every night, a little repetitive. So for once, we’re going to let the Biden administration speak for itself. This show has obtained some recently shot footage of Joe Biden and Kamala Harris, the president and vice president of the United States, or vice versa, depending on your view footage that shows them in their private moments deep within the federal compound in Washington.

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America is growing skeptical of the Gospel of Big Business

My mother is a firm believer in Jesus Christ as her personal Lord and Savior. When she receives an unexpected windfall, or a report of good health from her doctor, she says she’s been blessed. When things are not going well, it is God testing her faith in Him. Never, absolutely never, does she question decisions by her personal Lord and Savior.
This is the relationship many Americans have with business.
Except for a contingent on the far left, local companies, major firms and multinational corporations are revered. CEOs are venerated as job creators.

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