Our Global Accords: The Good, the Bad, the Meh, and the Huh?

This year, the United States played a lead role in crafting agreements to which the vast majority of the planet’s nations signed on. The first set a global minimum tax on corporate profits of 15 percent, as a way to keep many of the world’s largest firms from assigning their profits to the relative handful of nations with little or no corporate taxes. Ireland, Luxembourg, and various Caribbean mini-states had for years provided havens to the Apples of this world, depriving every other nation of the taxes that Apple et al.

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Our Global Accords: The Good, the Bad, the Meh, and the Huh?

This year, the United States played a lead role in crafting agreements to which the vast majority of the planet’s nations signed on. The first set a global minimum tax on corporate profits of 15 percent, as a way to keep many of the world’s largest firms from assigning their profits to the relative handful of nations with little or no corporate taxes. Ireland, Luxembourg, and various Caribbean mini-states had for years provided havens to the Apples of this world, depriving every other nation of the taxes that Apple et al.

Read original

Our Global Accords: The Good, the Bad, the Meh, and the Huh?

This year, the United States played a lead role in crafting agreements to which the vast majority of the planet’s nations signed on. The first set a global minimum tax on corporate profits of 15 percent, as a way to keep many of the world’s largest firms from assigning their profits to the relative handful of nations with little or no corporate taxes. Ireland, Luxembourg, and various Caribbean mini-states had for years provided havens to the Apples of this world, depriving every other nation of the taxes that Apple et al.

Read original

Our Global Accords: The Good, the Bad, the Meh, and the Huh?

This year, the United States played a lead role in crafting agreements to which the vast majority of the planet’s nations signed on. The first set a global minimum tax on corporate profits of 15 percent, as a way to keep many of the world’s largest firms from assigning their profits to the relative handful of nations with little or no corporate taxes. Ireland, Luxembourg, and various Caribbean mini-states had for years provided havens to the Apples of this world, depriving every other nation of the taxes that Apple et al.

Read original

Fossil Fuel Companies Owe Reparations to Countries They Are Destroying

Activists from Friends of the Earth during a demonstration calling for an end to all new oil and gas projects in the North Sea outside the UK government’s hub during the Cop26 summit in Glasgow. (Jane Barlow / Getty)

This story originally appeared in The Guardian and is part of “Climate Crimes,” a special series by The Guardian and Covering Climate Now. Mark Hertsgaard is Covering Climate Now’s executive director.

Glasgow, Scotland—Mohammed Nasheed made global headlines in 2009 by convening the world’s first underwater cabinet meeting.

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Fossil Fuel Companies Owe Reparations to Countries They Are Destroying

Activists from Friends of the Earth during a demonstration calling for an end to all new oil and gas projects in the North Sea outside the UK government’s hub during the Cop26 summit in Glasgow. (Jane Barlow / Getty)

This story originally appeared in The Guardian and is part of “Climate Crimes,” a special series by The Guardian and Covering Climate Now. Mark Hertsgaard is Covering Climate Now’s executive director.

Glasgow, Scotland—Mohammed Nasheed made global headlines in 2009 by convening the world’s first underwater cabinet meeting.

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Fossil fuel companies owe reparations to countries they are destroying | Mark Hertsgaard

Fossil fuel companies owe reparations to countries they are destroying

Mark Hertsgaard

Who pays for ‘loss and damage’ is in vogue at Cop26, but the authors of the climate emergency are still escaping accountability

The Maldives now spends 30% of its government budget adapting to climate change, including vast sums to desalinate water. Photograph: Carl Court/Getty Images

The Maldives now spends 30% of its government budget adapting to climate change, including vast sums to desalinate water.

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Is the Global Methane Pledge Just “Words on Paper”?

A flare burns natural gas at an oil well on August 26, 2021, in Watford City, N.D. (Matthew Brown / AP Photo)

This column is part of Covering Climate Now, a global journalism collaboration cofounded by Columbia Journalism Review and The Nation to strengthen coverage of the climate story.

This week at COP26, more than 70 countries, led by the European Union and the United States, formally announced their commitment to the Global Methane Pledge: a promise to reduce methane emissions by 30 percent by 2030.

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Is the Global Methane Pledge Just “Words on Paper”?

A flare burns natural gas at an oil well on August 26, 2021, in Watford City, N.D. (Matthew Brown / AP Photo)

This column is part of Covering Climate Now, a global journalism collaboration cofounded by Columbia Journalism Review and The Nation to strengthen coverage of the climate story.

This week at COP26, more than 70 countries, led by the European Union and the United States, formally announced their commitment to the Global Methane Pledge: a promise to reduce methane emissions by 30 percent by 2030.

Read original