If You Want to Have Court Filings Sealed, Don’t “Treat[] a Motion to Seal as an Afterthought”

From Judge Joshua Wolson’s opinion yesterday in Alchem Inc. v. Cage (E.D. Pa.), the background:

In this case, Alchem USA Inc. {[which] sells and markets liquid nicotine under the brand name “Nicselect”} knows that its former salesperson—and self-proclaimed “Nicotine Queen”—Terianne T. Cage, lured away some of its customers when she went to work for a competitor, North America Nicotine Inc. But Alchem can only guess how Ms. Cage solicited those customers and what information she used to do it, including whether she shared any of that information with NAN.

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If You Want to Have Court Filings Sealed, Don’t “Treat[] a Motion to Seal as an Afterthought”

From Judge Joshua Wolson’s opinion yesterday in Alchem Inc. v. Cage (E.D. Pa.), the background:

In this case, Alchem USA Inc. {[which] sells and markets liquid nicotine under the brand name “Nicselect”} knows that its former salesperson—and self-proclaimed “Nicotine Queen”—Terianne T. Cage, lured away some of its customers when she went to work for a competitor, North America Nicotine Inc. But Alchem can only guess how Ms. Cage solicited those customers and what information she used to do it, including whether she shared any of that information with NAN.

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The Supreme Court Now Has Roe in Its Sights

The Supreme Court is setting up a blockbuster series of rulings on the future of abortion rights in America. On Friday, the justices turned down a second request to temporarily block Texas’s de facto ban on most abortions, allowing the controversial S.B. 8 to stay in force while litigation unfolds. At the same time, the court used a rare procedural maneuver to fast-track two legal challenges to S.B. 8 for consideration on November 1—one month before it will also hear oral arguments on a pre-viability abortion ban in Mississippi.

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The New Campaign to Smear Palestinian Human Rights Defenders as Terrorists

A still from surveillance footage taken on the morning of July 29, 2021 inside the Defense for Children International – Palestine office in Ramallah. The still shows Israeli soldiers shortly after they broke down the door and began confiscating computers, laptops, and files. (Defense for Children International – Palestine)

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The New Campaign to Smear Palestinian Human Rights Defenders as Terrorists

A still from surveillance footage taken on the morning of July 29, 2021 inside the Defense for Children International – Palestine office in Ramallah. The still shows Israeli soldiers shortly after they broke down the door and began confiscating computers, laptops, and files. (Defense for Children International – Palestine)

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What the Supreme Court’s Sudden Intervention in the Texas Abortion Case Tells Us

On Friday, the Supreme Court took up two challenges to Texas’ S.B. 8, which bans abortion after six weeks. The justices did not, however, tee up a ruling on the merits of the law; instead, they agreed to decide whether procedural obstacles prevent anyone from filing a federal lawsuit against the measure. And while they scheduled oral arguments for Nov. 1, they did not block S.B. 8 in the meantime, ensuring that abortion will remain illegal in Texas until the court issues a decision.

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What the Supreme Court’s Sudden Intervention in the Texas Abortion Case Tells Us

On Friday, the Supreme Court took up two challenges to Texas’ S.B. 8, which bans abortion after six weeks. The justices did not, however, tee up a ruling on the merits of the law; instead, they agreed to decide whether procedural obstacles prevent anyone from filing a federal lawsuit against the measure. And while they scheduled oral arguments for Nov. 1, they did not block S.B. 8 in the meantime, ensuring that abortion will remain illegal in Texas until the court issues a decision.

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The Supreme Court’s very unusual new abortion orders, explained

The Supreme Court handed down a pair of very closely related orders on Friday concerning SB 8, a Texas law that effectively bans all abortions after the sixth week of pregnancy. The punchline is that the ban on nearly all abortions in Texas remains in effect, but the justices appear very eager to resolve the very unusual legal questions presented by this law.
The two orders arise out of two separate cases. Whole Woman’s Health v. Jackson is a suit brought by abortion providers hoping to block SB 8. United States v.

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The Supreme Court’s very unusual new abortion orders, explained

The Supreme Court handed down a pair of very closely related orders on Friday concerning SB 8, a Texas law that effectively bans all abortions after the sixth week of pregnancy. The punchline is that the ban on nearly all abortions in Texas remains in effect, but the justices appear very eager to resolve the very unusual legal questions presented by this law.
The two orders arise out of two separate cases. Whole Woman’s Health v. Jackson is a suit brought by abortion providers hoping to block SB 8. United States v.

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‘The State’s gambit has worked’: Justice Sotomayor decries the court’s refusal to lift the Texas abortion ban

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor issued a lone dissent on Friday as her colleagues once again refused to block the Texas abortion ban, even under a request from the Department of Justice.
The court did agree to take up the matter for oral arguments swiftly. On Monday, Nov. 1, the court will hear from both sides in the case on the question of whether the U.S. administration can intervene and temporarily block the law from going into effect as the cases proceed.

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