Chinese Province to Install Cutting-Edge Surveillance System to Spy on Journalists, Other ‘Suspicious People’

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Officials in China’s Henan province, one of the country’s largest provinces, plan to install a surveillance system to spy on journalists, international students, and other individuals who could pose a security risk to the Chinese regime.
Per the system’s blueprint, 3,000 facial recognition cameras connected to national and regional databases will be installed to scan for the identities of “suspicious people” who the government would like to monitor, according to documents Reuters reviewed on the Henan province procurement website.

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Challenging Georgia on Latino Voting Rights

Sergio Botello immigrated to Hall County, Georgia, from Mexico almost 30 years ago and recently became a citizen. His English is limited, and so when he was finally able to register to vote, he feared making unintentional mistakes that might attract the attention of county voting officials. He could not find sample ballots in Spanish, and he also lacked information about the issues and the candidates in his native language.

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Black People Need a Safe State in America—Let’s Make It Georgia

The trial of the three men accused of slaying Ahmaud Arbery has Black Americans walking on pins and needles once again. Whatever the jury decides, I’m afraid, will fail to address a damming question that the tragic incident symbolizes: How can Black people ever be secure in America?
Executed by three strangers while jogging in a white neighborhood, Arbery’s killing reflects the mindset of domination in the culture of white supremacy: the belief that any random white person has the right to accost and detain a Black person with impunity.

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Black People Need a Safe State in America—Let’s Make It Georgia

The trial of the three men accused of slaying Ahmaud Arbery has Black Americans walking on pins and needles once again. Whatever the jury decides, I’m afraid, will fail to address a damming question that the tragic incident symbolizes: How can Black people ever be secure in America?
Executed by three strangers while jogging in a white neighborhood, Arbery’s killing reflects the mindset of domination in the culture of white supremacy: the belief that any random white person has the right to accost and detain a Black person with impunity.

Read original

Why young black people like me are feeling let down by Kamala Harris

I’m a 26-year-old black New Yorker and I believe in supporting what’s right. That’s why I can’t be silent about Vice President Kamala Harris anymore. Along with 90 percent of black voters, I pulled the lever for Joe Biden in 2020, partly because Harris was on the ticket, and I had high hopes for our first black, female vice president. But now they’re fading fast.
After the presidential election a lot of black people and women across the country sang Harris’ praises.

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Why young black people like me are feeling let down by Kamala Harris

I’m a 26-year-old black New Yorker and I believe in supporting what’s right. That’s why I can’t be silent about Vice President Kamala Harris anymore. Along with 90 percent of black voters, I pulled the lever for Joe Biden in 2020, partly because Harris was on the ticket, and I had high hopes for our first black, female vice president. But now they’re fading fast.
After the presidential election a lot of black people and women across the country sang Harris’ praises.

Read original

Why young black people like me are feeling let down by Kamala Harris

I’m a 26-year-old black New Yorker and I believe in supporting what’s right. That’s why I can’t be silent about Vice President Kamala Harris anymore. Along with 90 percent of black voters, I pulled the lever for Joe Biden in 2020, partly because Harris was on the ticket, and I had high hopes for our first black, female vice president. But now they’re fading fast.
After the presidential election a lot of black people and women across the country sang Harris’ praises.

Read original

Why a state known for charter schools may be turning in a different direction

Minnesota is widely known as the land of 10,000 lakes—actually, there are more than 10,000. But the state, which was the first in the nation to pass a charter school law in 1991, could also be described as the land of school choice. Beyond charters, Minnesota is also home to the nation’s first comprehensive open enrollment law, dating back to the late 1980s, which allows K-12 students to attend any public school in a district of their choice, provided there is space in the host district.

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Why a state known for charter schools may be turning in a different direction

Minnesota is widely known as the land of 10,000 lakes—actually, there are more than 10,000. But the state, which was the first in the nation to pass a charter school law in 1991, could also be described as the land of school choice. Beyond charters, Minnesota is also home to the nation’s first comprehensive open enrollment law, dating back to the late 1980s, which allows K-12 students to attend any public school in a district of their choice, provided there is space in the host district.

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Op-Ed: Abortion restrictions widely punish military women

As the Supreme Court considers the constitutionality of an abortion ban and challenge to Roe vs. Wade, restrictions enacted in Texas and proposed elsewhere uniquely oppress military women.
Active-duty servicewomen experience higher rates of unintended pregnancy than the general population for various reasons. Military members’ medical care during training is often lacking, and their frequent change of providers interrupts their continuity of care.

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