The Revolution of 2020: How Trump’s Big Lie reshaped history after 220 years

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There are few words as overused as “revolution,” which has many Merriam-Webster definitions and here means “a fundamental change in political organization.” While people who discuss politics are prone to dramatic talk of “revolutions,” few of the American presidential elections described that way really merit the term. Franklin D. Roosevelt’s “revolution” of 1932 changed the nature and role of government in American life, and Ronald Reagan’s election in 1980 undid at least some of those changes.

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The non-solution to high gas prices every president is drawn to

What can a president do? He can urge OPEC countries to increase production, but not only will that make him look like a supplicant, it’s unlikely to work.

But President Biden, knowing that currently elevated prices have people upset — and that we can’t help comparing those prices to what they were last year, when lockdowns sent demand for gas, and therefore prices, plummeting — is taking action.

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Has Kamala Harris been sidelined?

But no matter. What does matter is that 10 months into the job, Harris’s approval rating is at just 28 percent, according to a USA Today/Suffolk University poll published on Nov. 7. Well, it beats nothing, I guess. More importantly, bad polls can change in a blink if you know what you’re doing.

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Alas, Harris doesn’t seem to. And she isn’t getting much support from the White House.

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Why Did The Washington Post Let Mark Meadows’s Lawyer Rewrite History?

When circumstances require you to make an insane argument, one rhetorical obstacle is a shortage of facts to support it. Donald Trump and his supporters address this difficulty by telling lies more bald-faced than anything we’ve seen since the red-baiting heyday of Joe McCarthy. “The election was rigged” is the new “I have here in my hand” a list of 205 Communists working in the State Department, or 57, or 81, or maybe it’s 10, and no, you can’t see it.

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Why Did The Washington Post Let Mark Meadows’s Lawyer Rewrite History?

When circumstances require you to make an insane argument, one rhetorical obstacle is a shortage of facts to support it. Donald Trump and his supporters address this difficulty by telling lies more bald-faced than anything we’ve seen since the red-baiting heyday of Joe McCarthy. “The election was rigged” is the new “I have here in my hand” a list of 205 Communists working in the State Department, or 57, or 81, or maybe it’s 10, and no, you can’t see it.

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Why Did The Washington Post Let Mark Meadows’s Lawyer Rewrite History?

When circumstances require you to make an insane argument, one rhetorical obstacle is a shortage of facts to support it. Donald Trump and his supporters address this difficulty by telling lies more bald-faced than anything we’ve seen since the red-baiting heyday of Joe McCarthy. “The election was rigged” is the new “I have here in my hand” a list of 205 Communists working in the State Department, or 57, or 81, or maybe it’s 10, and no, you can’t see it.

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The missing piece in Democrats’ approach to the White working class

So it has been the case for a while with White working-class voters, who have increasingly been giving their votes to the party whose most passionate and immutable commitment is to low taxes for the wealthy.

Yet in the various essays and analyses you can find from very smart Democrats, almost none of them focus on the one thing that would help their party the most, and which has proven to work: Not convincing those working-class voters to love Democrats, but convincing them to hate Republicans.

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Why Are Democrats So Afraid to Brag About the Economy?

Joe Biden has an inflation problem. On Wednesday, the Bureau of Labor Statistics released a report finding that the consumer price index had jumped 6.2 percent in October, the largest increase since George H.W. Bush’s presidency. Gas prices have climbed more than 12 percent in the last month and nearly 60 percent this year; food and energy costs have also skyrocketed. A recent Reuters/Ipsos poll found that two-thirds of Americans thought that inflation was a “big concern.” That shouldn’t be surprising: Inflation is rising faster than wages, a potentially nuclear political situation.

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Revived or comatose? Biden’s presidency one year from now.

In a 1992 presidential debate with a town hall format, a young man posed a nauseating question to President George H.W. Bush, Bill Clinton and H. Ross Perot: “How can we as symbolically the children of the future president, expect the two of you, the three of you, to meet our needs: the needs in housing, and, and, in crime and, you name it.”

The questioner was symptomatic of many Americans’ infantile inflation of presidents as daddies.

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The Virginia Governor Race Shows That Dems Can’t Count on Running Against Trump

Glenn Youngkin’s victory in Virginia’s gubernatorial race seems to have confirmed Democrats’ worst fears about the fragility of their coalition.
In a state that Joe Biden won by ten points and that hasn’t elected a Republican to statewide office in over a decade, Youngkin was able to defeat former governor Terry McAuliffe in a close race. What’s more, there are ominous signs that this isn’t a standard midterm reversal.

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