Gas-Powered Lawnmower Ban, Mandatory Gender-Neutral Toy Aisles Among California’s Weirdest New Laws

No California legislative year is complete without the passage of some asinine bills that promote progressive hobbyhorses, and this latest one was no exception. By the deadline last weekend, Gov. Gavin Newsom signed 770 bills (and vetoed 66 bills)—including a few measures that no doubt spurred a few more Texas relocations.
Perhaps the worst one was a ban on the sale of new gas-powered lawn equipment beginning 2024, or whenever regulators determine it to be “feasible.” This epitomized Democratic lawmakers’ approach to global warming.

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Gas-Powered Lawnmower Ban, Mandatory Gender-Neutral Toy Aisles Among California’s Weirdest New Laws

No California legislative year is complete without the passage of some asinine bills that promote progressive hobbyhorses, and this latest one was no exception. By the deadline last weekend, Gov. Gavin Newsom signed 770 bills (and vetoed 66 bills)—including a few measures that no doubt spurred a few more Texas relocations.
Perhaps the worst one was a ban on the sale of new gas-powered lawn equipment beginning 2024, or whenever regulators determine it to be “feasible.” This epitomized Democratic lawmakers’ approach to global warming.

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The fate of the planet will be negotiated in Glasgow

Almost every country in the world signed the 2015 Paris climate agreement, a monumental accord that aimed to limit global warming. But it was forged on a contradiction: Every signatory agreed that everyone must do something to address the urgent threat of climate change, but no one at the time pledged to do enough.
In the years since the agreement, the emissions that trap heat in Earth’s atmosphere have continued to rise.

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Plastics Destined to Create More Emissions Than Coal in the US, Study Finds

Christopher Pike/Bloomberg/Getty

Fight disinformation. Get a daily recap of the facts that matter. Sign up for the free Mother Jones newsletter.
This story was originally published by HuffPost and is reproduced here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration.
Plastics are everywhere. From the stomachs of deep-sea fish to human feces, Arctic snow to gusts of wind in the remote wilderness, the oil and gas byproduct has, barely a century after it was first synthesized in a laboratory, become a ubiquitous feature of virtually every ecosystem on Earth and every aspect of modern life.

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Plastics Destined to Create More Emissions Than Coal in the US, Study Finds

Christopher Pike/Bloomberg/Getty

Fight disinformation. Get a daily recap of the facts that matter. Sign up for the free Mother Jones newsletter.
This story was originally published by HuffPost and is reproduced here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration.
Plastics are everywhere. From the stomachs of deep-sea fish to human feces, Arctic snow to gusts of wind in the remote wilderness, the oil and gas byproduct has, barely a century after it was first synthesized in a laboratory, become a ubiquitous feature of virtually every ecosystem on Earth and every aspect of modern life.

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Kyrsten Sinema, John McCain, And The Bad Omens For Democrats’ Wildest Dreams

(Watch the video for a monologue on this article and an interview with The Washington Examiner’s Conn Carroll on exactly what’s not working for the Democrats — and what it means for the future.)
Imagine the following scenario: One political party holds the White House, the House of Representatives and — by a razor-thin margin — the U.S. Senate.
They have big plans: major, sweeping legislation. There’s a problem, though. Or to be precise, there are four problems.
First, the president is very unpopular; we’re talking mid-30-percent approval.

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Kyrsten Sinema, John McCain, And The Bad Omens For Democrats’ Wildest Dreams

(Watch the video for a monologue on this article and an interview with The Washington Examiner’s Conn Carroll on exactly what’s not working for the Democrats — and what it means for the future.)
Imagine the following scenario: One political party holds the White House, the House of Representatives and — by a razor-thin margin — the U.S. Senate.
They have big plans: major, sweeping legislation. There’s a problem, though. Or to be precise, there are four problems.
First, the president is very unpopular; we’re talking mid-30-percent approval.

Read original

Kyrsten Sinema, John McCain, And The Bad Omens For Democrats’ Wildest Dreams

(Watch the video for a monologue on this article and an interview with The Washington Examiner’s Conn Carroll on exactly what’s not working for the Democrats — and what it means for the future.)
Imagine the following scenario: One political party holds the White House, the House of Representatives and — by a razor-thin margin — the U.S. Senate.
They have big plans: major, sweeping legislation. There’s a problem, though. Or to be precise, there are four problems.
First, the president is very unpopular; we’re talking mid-30-percent approval.

Read original

Why Corporations Love DC’s Daily “Tip Sheets” Emails

Democrats in Washington have been negotiating the terms of President Joe Biden’s economic, health care, and climate bill for seven months, and most Americans have no idea what’s in it — or which popular provisions conservative Democrats are helping their corporate donors try to kill.

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RICHARD LITTLEJOHN: It’s Boris Johnson’s next Jolly Green Jape… bring back the woolly mammoths!

RICHARD LITTLEJOHN: It’s Boris Johnson’s next Jolly Green Jape… bring back the woolly mammoths! But in reality it is the longest economic suicide note in history
By Richard Littlejohn for the Daily Mail
Published: 17:00 EDT, 21 October 2021 | Updated: 17:24 EDT, 21 October 2021

Climate change, not humans, killed off the woolly mammoth, according to a new study from Cambridge University published this week.

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