The Job Market Is Far From Recovered

Between February and April 2020, the US economy lost over 22 million jobs, almost 15 percent of total employment. That was by far the largest job loss since the early years of the Great Depression. Between 1929 and 1932 or 1933 (depending on whose numbers you use, since there are no solid, official stats), 20 to 25 percent of jobs disappeared (again, depending on whose numbers you use). Since World War II, however, the worst contraction, the Great Recession of 2008–9, killed just over 6 percent of all jobs — a big number, but well short of 15 percent.

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President Joe Hoover

Herbert Clark Hoover was, for the bulk of his career as a mining engineer and later administrator of various post-World War I food relief agencies as well as Secretary of Commerce in the Harding and Coolidge presidencies, considered a star. On that basis he was elected the 31st president in a popular vote landslide in 1928.
And then.
Then, in the fall of 1929, the stock market crashed and the American economy tanked. The Great Depression had begun — and American politics changed for decades. Herbert Hoover was made into a villain by his Democratic Party opposition.

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Ignore the fearmongers: the 1970s are not coming back | James T Patterson

OpinionUS economy

Ignore the fearmongers: the 1970s are not coming back

Edward Berkowitz

Experts may invoke the specter of stagflation, but don’t look for a return of the economic conditions of the 1970s. We have too far to fall

‘People on the Street have begun to talk about the return of stagflation – rising unemployment and prices – a phenomenon associated with the 1970s.

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The politics of court-packing

NEWYou can now listen to Fox News articles!
If you can’t beat ‘em, pack the court.
Liberals have long wanted to get even with Republicans when it comes to the Supreme Court.
So some progressives pitched the idea of expanding the size of the court to strike a new balance. Or maybe even “reclaiming” some seats Democrats think the GOP “stole” from them over the past few years.
To wit:
Democrats watched then-Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky.

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The politics of court-packing

NEWYou can now listen to Fox News articles!
If you can’t beat ‘em, pack the court.
Liberals have long wanted to get even with Republicans when it comes to the Supreme Court.
So some progressives pitched the idea of expanding the size of the court to strike a new balance. Or maybe even “reclaiming” some seats Democrats think the GOP “stole” from them over the past few years.
To wit:
Democrats watched then-Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky.

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How a typo in a 1928 Supreme Court opinion promoted a misunderstanding of ‘property rights’: reporter

Back in 1928 — the year in which Republican Herbert Hoover was elected president of the United States and the start of the Great Depression was only a year away — a typo occurred with a written opinion by U.S. Supreme Court Justice Pierce Butler, who was quoted as using the word “property” when he meant to say “properly.” But journalist Adam Liptak, in an article published by the New York Times on October 18, stresses that Butler’s typo lived on for many years despite a correction.

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How Canadian Socialists Built a Working-Class Print Culture During the Great Depression

Imagine for a moment that you have in your hand a copy of a publication by a small but pugnacious leftist faction. The magazine is badly made and inconsistently printed. On top of the subscription price, its publishers are constantly asking you for money to help further the “cause.” Imagine, also, that there is a not-insignificant-chance that simply having that magazine in your home — or handing it to a friend — could put you at risk of arrest or police surveillance. You might, under these conditions, want to skip the newsstand entirely.

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How Canadian Socialists Built a Working-Class Print Culture During the Great Depression

Imagine for a moment that you have in your hand a copy of a publication by a small but pugnacious leftist faction. The magazine is badly made and inconsistently printed. On top of the subscription price, its publishers are constantly asking you for money to help further the “cause.” Imagine, also, that there is a not-insignificant-chance that simply having that magazine in your home — or handing it to a friend — could put you at risk of arrest or police surveillance. You might, under these conditions, want to skip the newsstand entirely.

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‘The Lehman Trilogy’ on Broadway Takes Capitalism, and Makes It Golden

Two and a half years ago, The Lehman Trilogy played in New York City’s cavernous Park Avenue Armory—and from where this critic was sitting it was lost, airless, and pretty unintelligible. Somewhere, over on my left, a stage consisting of a fancy glass cube fashioned into a variously partitioned office revolved in jerky fashion, as the story of the evolution of the famous banking family unfolded. Necks were craned, hopes the stage would draw closer were dashed. And this went on for over three and a half hours.

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Breaking Glass: Curriculum “Diversity” and Its Discontents

Katharine Hepburn, who made her television debut playing Amanda in The Glass Menagerie. (Bettmann / Getty Images)

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