How Gen Z is fighting back against Big Tech

As a seventh grader, Emma Lembke was one of the last in her friend group in Birmingham, Alabama, to get on social media. When she did, she says she soon found herself addicted, spending five hours a day on the apps, mostly Instagram.
“At an important developmental period in my life as a young female, as a young kid, in middle school, [I got] wound up in this world of likes, comments, very deeply quantifiable measures of my value, addictive algorithms, and the endless scroll,” she says.

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Democrats should temper their expensive enthusiasms with a clear-eyed look at the electorate

Biden’s agenda for swollen government resembles Franklin D. Roosevelt’s in 1933 and Lyndon B. Johnson’s in 1965. The stark differences are the popular-vote margins that put the three into the presidency: FDR, 17 percentage points; LBJ, 23 points; Biden, 4.5 points. So, in 1933, there were 59 Democratic senators (out of 96) and 313 Democratic representatives. In 1965, there were 68 Democratic senators and 295 Democratic representatives. Today, the numbers are 50 and 221.

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A Supreme Court Reform We Can All Support

I spend a fair amount of time criticizing the Supreme Court and the justices. I’ll probably do so more often in the months and years ahead. So it feels almost strange to recognize them for doing something that is unambiguously good: revamping their format for oral arguments this term. The long-overdue changes to the most public part of their work are better for the lawyers, better for the justices, and better for the American public. Unfortunately, not all of these tweaks are guaranteed to stick around.

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How the Greeks Can Help You Survive Thanksgiving

This week many celebrate Thanksgiving, a day when Americans gather with friends and family to celebrate the good things in their lives. Even if the reality of the holiday is more political squabbles, barely concealed daddy issues, partially buried family skeletons, and abdominal discomfort from overeating it holds a special place in our hearts and culture as a celebration of home, togetherness, and family.
For the last two years, however, like so much during the pandemic, Thanksgiving has been on hold.

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How the Greeks Can Help You Survive Thanksgiving

This week many celebrate Thanksgiving, a day when Americans gather with friends and family to celebrate the good things in their lives. Even if the reality of the holiday is more political squabbles, barely concealed daddy issues, partially buried family skeletons, and abdominal discomfort from overeating it holds a special place in our hearts and culture as a celebration of home, togetherness, and family.
For the last two years, however, like so much during the pandemic, Thanksgiving has been on hold.

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The COVID Anti-Vax Movement Has History on Its Side

In the 1820s and 1830s, acolytes of New Hampshire autodidact Samuel Thomson fought the imposition of medical licensure requirements, arguing that people should be allowed to pay practitioners who advised lobelia, cayenne pepper, and steam baths to treat sickness rather than those who followed the more orthodox courses of bleeding and dosing with calomel. In the 1890s, philosopher William James campaigned against a medical registration act before the Massachusetts Legislature, arguing that the bill is “too grandmotherly, and goes against the best habits and traditions of our state.

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Yes, plant-based meat is better for the planet

Plant-based meat has gone mainstream. The Impossible Burger, which debuted at a single restaurant five years ago, is now on Burger King’s permanent menu. And McDonald’s is testing its McPlant burger, featuring a Beyond Meat patty, in select US locations. Both plant-based startups are now veterans in a product category that did $1.4 billion in sales and grew 27 percent in 2020.
Under the tagline “Eat Meat.

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