Novelist Almudena Grandes Told the Truth About the Spanish Dictatorship

Almudena Grandes, who died on Saturday, aged 61, did more than any novelist of her generation to change the way her country relates to its twentieth-century past.
Born in 1960 in Madrid, she first made a name for herself in 1989 with an erotic novel, Las edades de Lulú (The Ages of Lulú), which inspired a film of the same name, directed by Bigas Luna and starring Francesca Neri and a young Javier Bardem.

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The red flags of a religious cult — and what it’s like to escape one

“I own me.” This sentence, comprised of three short words, seems inarguable. But when attorney and author Faith Jones says them aloud, as she does in her 2019 TED Talk and in her new book, “Sex Cult Nun: Breaking Away from the Children of God, a Wild, Radical Religious Cult,” they symbolize a lifetime of experience, learning and healing.
Jones was born into and raised within the powerful Children of God, later known as the Family, a religious group founded by her grandfather David Berg.

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How Gen Z is fighting back against Big Tech

As a seventh grader, Emma Lembke was one of the last in her friend group in Birmingham, Alabama, to get on social media. When she did, she says she soon found herself addicted, spending five hours a day on the apps, mostly Instagram.
“At an important developmental period in my life as a young female, as a young kid, in middle school, [I got] wound up in this world of likes, comments, very deeply quantifiable measures of my value, addictive algorithms, and the endless scroll,” she says.

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The Best Reads of 2021

Don’t let our Grinch of a president steal Christmas — check out our gift recommendations for the conservative book lovers in your life!
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R. Emmett Tyrrell, Jr: How long does it take an author to write a very good book? Consider this. I invited Andrew Roberts, who has become the Paul Johnson of his era, to my wedding back in 1998. He gave Jeanne and me on that occasion as wedding gifts two 18th-century Parliamentary proclamations signed by George III, the last king of America.

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Thanks for giving

OPINION:
For some, this Thanksgiving – like last year — is a more difficult occasion than previous ones. Perhaps a loved one has died from COVID-19, or you feel isolated from relatives and friends due to lockdowns, quarantines, travel restrictions, vaccinations (or not), masks and “distancing” and might think you have little to celebrate or be thankful for.
You might be struggling over what to do with an errant child or grandchild who ought to be thankful for what has been done for him or her but is headed down the wrong road.

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Thanksgiving reflections on grace and growth for uncertain times

To call the past few years a time of upheaval is a pretty huge understatement. Gender roles and gender identity, race and justice, capitalism and socialism, hyperpolarization, wars, and pandemics – all have brought disruption at levels unseen in generations. Now we’re witnessing what economists are calling the Great Resignation, the unprecedented decision by many Americans to voluntarily quit their jobs, step back, and ask what they really want from work and life. 
In some ways, this time of year is about doing just that. Yes, there are turkeys and presents and holiday music.

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Who’s Afraid of Climate Geoengineering?

The news about global warming, er, global climate change (GCC), continues to worsen. It’s now turning animals into shape-shifters as they adapt by changing the size of their ears, tails, beaks and other appendages, reports a team of scientists. Maybe nobody would make fun of Baby Dumbo anymore; his ears would be used for fans, powered by “renewable fuels.”
If you’re reading this publication, you’re probably what’s called a “climate denialist.

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Remote Work Won’t End Exploitation

Among the many transformations to people’s ways of living since the start of the global pandemic, none has received as much attention from the media as the increase in the prevalence of remote work. The World Economic Forum has observed that the opportunities to work remotely are not equally distributed: well-paid workers in “high-skilled” industries are more likely to work from home than their service-industry counterparts. So worrisome is this trend that economists have gone as far as to refer to it as a ticking “time bomb for inequality.

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Remote Work Won’t End Exploitation

Among the many transformations to people’s ways of living since the start of the global pandemic, none has received as much attention from the media as the increase in the prevalence of remote work. The World Economic Forum has observed that the opportunities to work remotely are not equally distributed: well-paid workers in “high-skilled” industries are more likely to work from home than their service-industry counterparts. So worrisome is this trend that economists have gone as far as to refer to it as a ticking “time bomb for inequality.

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Remote Work Won’t End Exploitation

Among the many transformations to people’s ways of living since the start of the global pandemic, none has received as much attention from the media as the increase in the prevalence of remote work. The World Economic Forum has observed that the opportunities to work remotely are not equally distributed: well-paid workers in “high-skilled” industries are more likely to work from home than their service-industry counterparts. So worrisome is this trend that economists have gone as far as to refer to it as a ticking “time bomb for inequality.

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