One Good Thing: How fashion became a part of The Nanny’s legacy

The often-used meme, “I watched it for the plot,” is an irony-laden acknowledgment that we, as viewers, often gravitate toward eye candy. Most people prefer to watch flashy productions and beautiful celebrities over “highbrow” content; they have a knack for avoiding convoluted plot lines that force the viewer to think. This is not an incrimination but a very real aspect of our media consumption. Even Netflix’s official social media accounts have leaned into the joke to promote shows like Squid Game.

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In the Wake of Rittenhouse, Our Defamation Laws Must Be Changed (Part Two of Two)

For background on how America came to have the inadequate defamation laws now in place, please see Part One of this discussion here.
It now has been more than half a century since the liberal Warren Court handed down its many rulings. So much has changed. It used to be that an honest effort at a true story could cause a publication to find itself sued into instant bankruptcy. Not everyone easily could access a copy of the Sunday New York Times or even of a copy of a Time magazine issue two or three weeks after the thing appeared.

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Cowboy Bebop, explained

Halfway through the fifth episode of Cowboy Bebop, the seminal late ’90s anime series about a roguish bounty hunter fighting crime and traveling through space, the show explains itself. A title card briefly appears on screen, and we see what looks like a pitch for the very show we’re in the middle of watching.
“This is not a kind of Space Opera,” the card reads, referring to the by-then-well-trodden genre of epic spaceship flyovers and majestic, exotic fantasy worlds in the far reaches of the galaxy. “It is a sort of Space Jazz which is filled with street sense and life.

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The elites love ‘Succession,’ but Trump-world-set ‘Yellowstone’ is TV’s most addictive show

To judge by the passions and interests of the Twitterati and those who dominate the cultural conversation in the United States, you would think the most important, most beloved, most addictive show on television is HBO’s “Succession.”
Its third-season premiere in October was watched by 1.8 million people — an all-time high for the show (so says The Hollywood Reporter) that was “driven largely by digital platforms and HBO Max in particular.

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The elites love ‘Succession,’ but Trump-world-set ‘Yellowstone’ is TV’s most addictive show

To judge by the passions and interests of the Twitterati and those who dominate the cultural conversation in the United States, you would think the most important, most beloved, most addictive show on television is HBO’s “Succession.”
Its third-season premiere in October was watched by 1.8 million people — an all-time high for the show (so says The Hollywood Reporter) that was “driven largely by digital platforms and HBO Max in particular.

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Twitter isn’t real life, and we have the data to prove it

To any young writers out there trying to get their start, I offer the most important piece of advice: Never, ever, ever read the comments.
But for too many leaders, brands, and public figures these days, absorption into the world of the “very online” leads to the decision to react to things that aren’t real, to focus on issues that aren’t genuinely important, and to distract themselves away from where their actual constituency (their voters, their supporters, their customers) stands.

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Twitter isn’t real life, and we have the data to prove it

To any young writers out there trying to get their start, I offer the most important piece of advice: Never, ever, ever read the comments.
But for too many leaders, brands, and public figures these days, absorption into the world of the “very online” leads to the decision to react to things that aren’t real, to focus on issues that aren’t genuinely important, and to distract themselves away from where their actual constituency (their voters, their supporters, their customers) stands.

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Twitter isn’t real life, and we have the data to prove it

To any young writers out there trying to get their start, I offer the most important piece of advice: Never, ever, ever read the comments.
But for too many leaders, brands, and public figures these days, absorption into the world of the “very online” leads to the decision to react to things that aren’t real, to focus on issues that aren’t genuinely important, and to distract themselves away from where their actual constituency (their voters, their supporters, their customers) stands.

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LeBron James’s antipathy toward Kyle Rittenhouse fits a pattern

On Wednesday afternoon, LeBron James took to Twitter to attack Kyle Rittenhouse’s emotional testimony, insinuating that he was a liar and a faker. James quoted a tweet about the story, stating, “What tears????? I didn’t see one. Man knock it off! That boy ate some lemon heads before walking into court.”
James’s ridicule falls in line with much of the scorn coming from the country’s celebrities and elites. And his social media behavior reveals a disturbing pattern that goes beyond antipathy toward Rittenhouse.

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Chris Christie Already Lost His War With Donald Trump

Six years ago, during the interminable 2016 GOP presidential primary, Donald Trump stole Chris Christie’s brand. In the years leading up to their fateful encounter in the presidential race, Christie had, at least among Republicans, cultivated a breakout persona and gotten the media to swoon over his brash, no-nonsense ways. While he was nominally the governor of New Jersey, he was, in many ways, a classic New Yorker: which is to say a cartoonish jerk.

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