Clarence Thomas’s Monumental Legacy

Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas talks in his chambers at the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, D.C., in 2016. (Jonathan Ernst/Reuters)
Thirty years after joining the Supreme Court, Justice Thomas continues to champion the preservation of principle and liberty in American law.
Today marks 30 years since Justice Clarence Thomas joined the United States Supreme Court.

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The Kind Soul of Clarence Thomas

Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas speaks at the Heritage Foundation in Washington, D.C., October 21, 2021. (Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
He’s a gifted originalist, of course. But we shouldn’t forget the depth of his kindness.
I sat motionless in front of my laptop, trying desperately to clear my foggy head when my phone rang. It was Justice Thomas, who this weekend marks 30 years on the Supreme Court.

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Clarence Thomas, an American Justice

NRPLUS MEMBER ARTICLE I first met Justice Clarence Thomas in June 1992, at the end of his first year on the Supreme Court. He was interviewing me, a 25-year-old fresh out of law school, for a clerkship job. He found me to have strong opinions and little experience. Revealing an early wisdom, he hired someone else. Displaying his generosity, he changed his mind a year later.
The interview remains indelible in my memory, as meetings with Justice Thomas probably do for most everyone.

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The World’s Most Hated Architect Created One Hell of a Library

“Bleeds you dry.” “Exuberantly shallow… kitsch.” “Such arrogance.” “An epic boondoggle.” “A one-trick pony.”
That’s just a sample of the invective directed at one of the world’s most famous architects—Santiago Calatrava. While beloved by many for his edgy, gravity-defying, and photogenic works, he’s also probably the world’s most hated architect.

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Teaching Thomas

Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas in his chambers at the U.S. Supreme Court building in Washington, D.C., June 6, 2016. (Jonathan Ernst/Reuters )
Over the past 30 years, Justice Thomas has taken the American people on a tour of constitutional law. For that, we should all be grateful.
This semester, we co-taught a seminar on originalism at Notre Dame Law School. The course focused on cases in which originalist justices sparred with one another — and with non-originalist colleagues — about important issues of constitutional law.

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Inside Japan’s Meltdown Over Princess’ ‘Cursed’ Wedding to Commoner

TOKYO—At long last, Japan’s Princess Mako and her “commoner” boyfriend, Kei Komuro, will marry on Oct. 26, after a three-year delay. But will they live happily ever after?
Yes, probably, if they follow through on their plans and get the hell out of Japan.
Opposition to the marriage by the general public, the press, and conservative politicians is strong. In an opinion poll taken by AERA magazine, 93 percent of respondents said they felt the marriage was nothing to celebrate.

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Why Do Democrats Want To Create More Eric Garners?

The 2014 killing of Eric Garner by a New York City police officer is an example of how enforcement of even petty laws (in this case, tobacco taxes) can be lethal. Peddling a few loose cigarettes in defiance of the government might carry a death sentence when cops impose the state’s will.

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A Night To Remember With Justice Thomas

This evening, the Heritage Foundation and the C. Boyden Gray Center for the Study of the Administrative State at Antonin Scalia Law School hosted a night to remember. We celebrated Justice Thomas’s thirtieth anniversary on the bench. It was truly a star-studded affair.
First, the Honorable C. Boyden Gray presented the inaugural Justice Clarence Thomas First Principles Award to Judge Laurence Silberman. I didn’t know how instrumental Silberman was to Thomas’s appointment to the D.C. Circuit, and later the Supreme Court.

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Three Excellent Items on TrapHouseGate and Yale Law School

David Lat (Original Jurisdiction), “The Latest (Ridiculous) Controversy At Yale Law School”.
David Lat, “The Yale Law School Email Controversy: An Interview With Trent Colbert” (Colbert is the student who wrote the e-mail), and
Conor Friedersdorf (Atlantic), “A Worrisome Peek Inside Yale Law’s Diversity Bureaucracy”.

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Three Excellent Items on TrapHouseGate and Yale Law School

David Lat (Original Jurisdiction), “The Latest (Ridiculous) Controversy At Yale Law School”.
David Lat, “The Yale Law School Email Controversy: An Interview With Trent Colbert” (Colbert is the student who wrote the e-mail), and
Conor Friedersdorf (Atlantic), “A Worrisome Peek Inside Yale Law’s Diversity Bureaucracy”.

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