AT&T has yet to answer for its support of OAN — and customers have had it

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NAACP President Derrick Johnson is set to meet with AT&T leadership at the company’s Washington, D.C. headquarters today to discuss AT&T’s relationship with One America News (OAN). Johnson condemned AT&T after a Reuters investigation published earlier this month found that a lucrative contract with AT&T-owned platforms was responsible for 90% of OAN parent company Herring Networks, Inc.’s funding, and that AT&T even had a hand in creating OAN when it launched in 2013.

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Republicans May Revive the Most Dangerous Kind of Gerrymandering

Across the country, legislators are carving up their states along political and racial lines to create new districts for the 2022 election. The lawmakers now have sweeping discretion to entrench their own parties’ power thanks to the Supreme Court’s conservatives who have greenlighted partisan gerrymandering and abandoned real limits on racial gerrymandering. Republicans are aggressively diluting the votes of Black and Hispanic residents in diverse states like Texas.

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Republicans May Revive the Most Dangerous Kind of Gerrymandering

Across the country, legislators are carving up their states along political and racial lines to create new districts for the 2022 election. The lawmakers now have sweeping discretion to entrench their own parties’ power thanks to the Supreme Court’s conservatives who have greenlighted partisan gerrymandering and abandoned real limits on racial gerrymandering. Republicans are aggressively diluting the votes of Black and Hispanic residents in diverse states like Texas.

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A Jim Crow–Era Murder. A Family Secret. Decades Later, What Does Justice Look Like?

Fight disinformation. Get a daily recap of the facts that matter. Sign up for the free Mother Jones newsletter.
Joyce Faye Nelson-Crockett was 13 years old in 1955, dancing to a jukebox in the Hughes Cafe on a Saturday night in East Texas with her sister and her 16-year-old cousin, John Earl Reese. The boy had come home to the nearby town of Mayflower earlier that day after a summer away picking cotton, and he held Nelson-Crockett’s hand as he spun her around the room. All of a sudden, a sharp crack interrupted the music.

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A Jim Crow–Era Murder. A Family Secret. Decades Later, What Does Justice Look Like?

Fight disinformation. Get a daily recap of the facts that matter. Sign up for the free Mother Jones newsletter.
Joyce Faye Nelson-Crockett was 13 years old in 1955, dancing to a jukebox in the Hughes Cafe on a Saturday night in East Texas with her sister and her 16-year-old cousin, John Earl Reese. The boy had come home to the nearby town of Mayflower earlier that day after a summer away picking cotton, and he held Nelson-Crockett’s hand as he spun her around the room. All of a sudden, a sharp crack interrupted the music.

Read original

A Jim Crow–Era Murder. A Family Secret. Decades Later, What Does Justice Look Like?

Fight disinformation. Get a daily recap of the facts that matter. Sign up for the free Mother Jones newsletter.
Joyce Faye Nelson-Crockett was 13 years old in 1955, dancing to a jukebox in the Hughes Cafe on a Saturday night in East Texas with her sister and her 16-year-old cousin, John Earl Reese. The boy had come home to the nearby town of Mayflower earlier that day after a summer away picking cotton, and he held Nelson-Crockett’s hand as he spun her around the room. All of a sudden, a sharp crack interrupted the music.

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Is Biden Doing Enough to Protect Democracy?

As a reporter for The Philadelphia Inquirer in the early 2000s, I once received a call from a couple of Republican campaign operatives who said they had something to show me. We met at their office in Washington, D.C., a few days later. They presented printouts of recent election records and pointed to a few cases of what they suspected were people voting illegally. One after another, their examples of voter fraud turned out to be nothing.

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Will a New Study on Menthol Cigarettes’ Harm to Black Americans Finally Push the FDA to Act?

Tobacco researchers have known for decades that mentholated cigarettes do outsized harm to Black Americans. And now, a recent study from University of Michigan public health researchers David Mendez and Thuy Le bolsters that understanding.
According to the study, there were 157,000 smoking-related premature deaths among Black Americans, and 1.5 million years of life lost, between 1980 and 2018. That’s 12 percent of the U.S. population shouldering 41 percent and 50 percent, respectively, of the total damage caused by menthols during that time frame. Additionally, 1.

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Will a New Study on Menthol Cigarettes’ Harm to Black Americans Finally Push the FDA to Act?

Tobacco researchers have known for decades that mentholated cigarettes do outsized harm to Black Americans. And now, a recent study from University of Michigan public health researchers David Mendez and Thuy Le bolsters that understanding.
According to the study, there were 157,000 smoking-related premature deaths among Black Americans, and 1.5 million years of life lost, between 1980 and 2018. That’s 12 percent of the U.S. population shouldering 41 percent and 50 percent, respectively, of the total damage caused by menthols during that time frame. Additionally, 1.

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Will a New Study on Menthol Cigarettes’ Harm to Black Americans Finally Push the FDA to Act?

Tobacco researchers have known for decades that mentholated cigarettes do outsized harm to Black Americans. And now, a recent study from University of Michigan public health researchers David Mendez and Thuy Le bolsters that understanding.
According to the study, there were 157,000 smoking-related premature deaths among Black Americans, and 1.5 million years of life lost, between 1980 and 2018. That’s 12 percent of the U.S. population shouldering 41 percent and 50 percent, respectively, of the total damage caused by menthols during that time frame. Additionally, 1.

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