Canceling Thomas Jefferson

Statue of President Thomas Jefferson in the council chambers of New York City Hall, October 19, 2021. (Carlo Allegri/Reuters)
After more than a century, the New York City Council is removing a statue of Thomas Jefferson from its chamber. The decision, which was made by the New York City Public Design Commission, was unanimous.
It was wrong, too.
Justifying the move, Councilperson Adrienne Adams proposed that Jefferson had to go because he “embodied some of the most shameful parts of our country’s long and nuanced history.

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Poaching is altering the genetics of wild animals

Sometime in the distant past, well before humans walked the Earth, the ancestors of modern-day elephants evolved their iconic tusks. Elephants use their bleach-white incisors — they’re technically giant teeth, like ours but longer — to dig, collect food, and protect themselves.
Then Homo sapiens arrived, and elephant tusks became a liability. Poachers kill the massive animals for their tusks, which are worth about $330 a pound wholesale as of 2017. Hunters slaughter roughly 20,000 elephants a year to supply the global ivory trade, according to the World Wildlife Fund.

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You Can’t Fight Campus Illiberalism With More Illiberalism

I consider my children to be extraordinarily lucky to be born and live in the United States. When I moved here from France in 1999, I believed that, while far from perfect, America still very much embraced the values held by its founders, especially a respect for pluralism and viewpoint diversity.
In fact, I’ve long believed that the First Amendment’s protections for freedom of religion, speech, press, assembly, and petition are indispensable ingredients for the success of a country with hundreds of millions of diverse people whose ancestors arrived here from all over the world.

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You Can’t Fight Campus Illiberalism With More Illiberalism

I consider my children to be extraordinarily lucky to be born and live in the United States. When I moved here from France in 1999, I believed that, while far from perfect, America still very much embraced the values held by its founders, especially a respect for pluralism and viewpoint diversity.
In fact, I’ve long believed that the First Amendment’s protections for freedom of religion, speech, press, assembly, and petition are indispensable ingredients for the success of a country with hundreds of millions of diverse people whose ancestors arrived here from all over the world.

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Has the DOJ’s Campaign to Root Out Chinese Spies on College Campuses Gone Too Far?

Fight disinformation. Get a daily recap of the facts that matter. Sign up for the free Mother Jones newsletter.
In late August 2019, federal agents converged on a leafy cul-de-sac in Lawrence, Kansas, and arrested a chemical engineer named Feng “Franklin” Tao. His alleged crime? Working a second job in China while employed as a professor at the University of Kansas. He became the latest academic of Chinese descent to be apprehended under a Trump-era program aimed at “countering Chinese national security threats,” particularly at research labs and universities.

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Has the DOJ’s Campaign to Root Out Chinese Spies on College Campuses Gone Too Far?

Fight disinformation. Get a daily recap of the facts that matter. Sign up for the free Mother Jones newsletter.
In late August 2019, federal agents converged on a leafy cul-de-sac in Lawrence, Kansas, and arrested a chemical engineer named Feng “Franklin” Tao. His alleged crime? Working a second job in China while employed as a professor at the University of Kansas. He became the latest academic of Chinese descent to be apprehended under a Trump-era program aimed at “countering Chinese national security threats,” particularly at research labs and universities.

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The Framers Likely Would’ve Flunked the Filibuster

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This week, Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer was looking to move forward on the Freedom to Vote Act. However, the bill will not come up for a vote after Republicans filibustered it Wednesday, and given the 60-vote threshold needed for the Senate to overcome that maneuver. This has enraged many Democrats as they see time running out on their slim legislative majorities in the House and Senate. The inability to break the filibuster has become a frequent subject of scorn to both parties over the years.

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The Framers Likely Would’ve Flunked the Filibuster

X

Story Stream

recent articles

This week, Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer was looking to move forward on the Freedom to Vote Act. However, the bill will not come up for a vote after Republicans filibustered it Wednesday, and given the 60-vote threshold needed for the Senate to overcome that maneuver. This has enraged many Democrats as they see time running out on their slim legislative majorities in the House and Senate. The inability to break the filibuster has become a frequent subject of scorn to both parties over the years.

Read original

The Framers Likely Would’ve Flunked the Filibuster

X

Story Stream

recent articles

This week, Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer was looking to move forward on the Freedom to Vote Act. However, the bill will not come up for a vote after Republicans filibustered it Wednesday, and given the 60-vote threshold needed for the Senate to overcome that maneuver. This has enraged many Democrats as they see time running out on their slim legislative majorities in the House and Senate. The inability to break the filibuster has become a frequent subject of scorn to both parties over the years.

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Fighting Illiberalism in Higher Education

Opinion

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Posted: Oct 21, 2021 12:01 AM

The opinions expressed by columnists are their own and do not necessarily represent the views of Townhall.com.

I consider my children to be extraordinarily lucky to be born and live in the United States.

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