Clarence Thomas’s Monumental Legacy

Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas talks in his chambers at the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, D.C., in 2016. (Jonathan Ernst/Reuters)
Thirty years after joining the Supreme Court, Justice Thomas continues to champion the preservation of principle and liberty in American law.
Today marks 30 years since Justice Clarence Thomas joined the United States Supreme Court.

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The Kind Soul of Clarence Thomas

Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas speaks at the Heritage Foundation in Washington, D.C., October 21, 2021. (Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
He’s a gifted originalist, of course. But we shouldn’t forget the depth of his kindness.
I sat motionless in front of my laptop, trying desperately to clear my foggy head when my phone rang. It was Justice Thomas, who this weekend marks 30 years on the Supreme Court.

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Clarence Thomas, an American Justice

NRPLUS MEMBER ARTICLE I first met Justice Clarence Thomas in June 1992, at the end of his first year on the Supreme Court. He was interviewing me, a 25-year-old fresh out of law school, for a clerkship job. He found me to have strong opinions and little experience. Revealing an early wisdom, he hired someone else. Displaying his generosity, he changed his mind a year later.
The interview remains indelible in my memory, as meetings with Justice Thomas probably do for most everyone.

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White House Once Again Delays Release of JFK Assassination Documents

Secret government files relating to the assassination of President John F. Kennedy were supposed to be released by next week. But now President Joe Biden has postponed the release once again, this time blaming delays caused by the coronavirus pandemic. The documents will now be released in two batches, one later this year and a larger one late next year, Biden said in a White House memo.

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Ventura County: Jacobson, and not “Traditional Constitutional Review” Governs Second Amendment Claims

Last week, the Ninth Circuit heard oral argument in McDougall v. County of Ventura, California. This case presented a challenge to the County’s COVID-19 restrictions on houses of worship.

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Public Records Requests Shines A Light on Justice Barrett’s Speech at the McConnell Center

Fix the Courts made a public records request to the University of Louisville. The organization received a 120+ page document dump concerning Justice Barrett’s visit to the McConnell Center in September 2021. I went through the tranche of documents, and found a few items of interest. (FOIA dumps are generally sorted with the most recent emails at the top, so I usually start reading at the end).
There was a back-and-forth about press restrictions between the Public Information Office, and Gary Gregg at the McConnell Center.

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Turkey’s Erdogan Orders Removal of 10 Western Ambassadors, Including U.S. Envoy

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan said Saturday he had ordered his government’s foreign ministry to declare 10 ambassadors from Western countries “persona non grata” shortly after their embassies called for the release of Osman Kavala, a philanthropist and civil society activist. Although it wasn’t immediately clear whether Turkey would expel the ambassadors, with Erdogan only saying that he wanted the declaration that made clear the ambassadors are not welcome “as soon as possible.

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Alec Baldwin Was Told Prop Gun Was Safe to Use Before Fatal Shooting

When an assistant director handed Alec Baldwin a loaded weapon he let everyone know it was safe to use. “Cold gun,” Dave Halls yelled on Thursday as the film crew and actors prepared to rehearse a scene, two words meant to convey that the weapon didn’t have any live ammo, according to a search warrant. But the truth was quite the opposite and when Baldwin pulled the trigger, he killed cinematographer Halyna Hutchins and wounded director Joel Souza. Halls also didn’t know there were live rounds in the prop gun, according to the Santa Fe County Sheriff’s Office.

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Giuliani Associate Lev Parnas Convicted of Campaign Finance Crimes

Lev Parnas, the businessman from Florida who is an associate of Rudolph Giuliani, was convicted Friday of campaign finance crimes, including funneling money from a Russian entrepreneur to U.S. political campaigns. The jury took only a couple of hours to decide that Parnas was guilty on all six felony counts. They determined that Parnas committed fraud by making donations to state and federal candidates that were paid for by a Russian financier.

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NIMBY New Yorkers Sue City Over ‘Proliferation of Outdoor Dining’

A group of New York City residents has sued the city to end the “proliferation of outdoor dining” that’s taken place under the city’s Open Restaurants Program, which expanded al fresco dining options during the COVID-19 pandemic. 
The Open Restaurants Program was launched by Mayor Bill de Blasio (D) in June 2020.

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