The case for funding bike infrastructure

Jake Moffitt, a 38-year-old data center technician in the Dallas area, was used to biking to work.
He did it all the time when he lived in Albuquerque, and thought he’d try the same when he moved to Dallas five years ago. Moffitt says he lasted six months before he threw in the towel.
“It was really just scary,” Moffitt told Vox. “Driving is pretty much the only option I have.”
One of the largest cities in Texas, Dallas doesn’t have much in the way of street biking infrastructure.

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The case for funding bike infrastructure

Jake Moffitt, a 38-year-old data center technician in the Dallas area, was used to biking to work.
He did it all the time when he lived in Albuquerque, and thought he’d try the same when he moved to Dallas five years ago. Moffitt says he lasted six months before he threw in the towel.
“It was really just scary,” Moffitt told Vox. “Driving is pretty much the only option I have.”
One of the largest cities in Texas, Dallas doesn’t have much in the way of street biking infrastructure.

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Editorial: Trying to cross the street shouldn’t be a crime

California has recognized that there are environmental, public health and mobility benefits to getting people out of cars and into other modes of travel, including biking, walking and taking public transit. Yet in too many instances, state law still favors cars.
Take, for example, jaywalking. In California, it’s illegal to cross the street mid-block or to cross against a traffic signal. Yet almost anyone who travels by foot has violated this law at least once, or even once a day — and not because they’re scofflaws or miscreants.

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Don’t Import Vaccine Mandates for Domestic Travel

As frustrating as it is to those of us who believe in the right to freely roam, international travel is treated as a privilege subject to regulations, document checks, and the whims of government officials. Those restrictions tightened during the pandemic, meaning that the White House’s plan to allow entry to travelers who have been vaccinated and tested for COVID-19 constitute an easing of rules for visitors from other countries.

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Illinois Just Won a Big Green Jobs Victory

Billionaire Illinois governor J.B. Pritzker, hardly a tribune of the people, signed one of the nation’s most sweeping green energy bills into law on September 15. Called the Climate and Equitable Jobs Act, SB 2408 invests in renewable energy and electric transportation, while making enormous advances in workers’ rights and equity in these sectors. There’s a lot of good news for the future of life on earth. It’s also groundbreaking, for climate policy, in protecting the interests of workers.

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Illinois Just Won a Big Green Jobs Victory

Billionaire Illinois governor J.B. Pritzker, hardly a tribune of the people, signed one of the nation’s most sweeping green energy bills into law on September 15. Called the Climate and Equitable Jobs Act, SB 2408 invests in renewable energy and electric transportation, while making enormous advances in workers’ rights and equity in these sectors. There’s a lot of good news for the future of life on earth. It’s also groundbreaking, for climate policy, in protecting the interests of workers.

Read original

Illinois Just Won a Big Green Jobs Victory

Billionaire Illinois governor J.B. Pritzker, hardly a tribune of the people, signed one of the nation’s most sweeping green energy bills into law on September 15. Called the Climate and Equitable Jobs Act, SB 2408 invests in renewable energy and electric transportation, while making enormous advances in workers’ rights and equity in these sectors. There’s a lot of good news for the future of life on earth. It’s also groundbreaking, for climate policy, in protecting the interests of workers.

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The Great Supply Shock We Brought Upon Ourselves

At least once over the past 18 months, when you tried to order something online or visited a retail store, you have probably experienced something Americans are not supposed to feel: scarcity. Shortages of all kinds have lingered and even worsened over the past 18 months, in every product imaginable: Hot tubs, automobiles, books, fertilizer, plastic pipettes for labs, paint, semiconductor chips, place mats, french fries at Burger King, emergency supplies for disaster aid, aluminum cans, and yes, once again, toilet paper.

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The Great Supply Shock We Brought Upon Ourselves

At least once over the past 18 months, when you tried to order something online or visited a retail store, you have probably experienced something Americans are not supposed to feel: scarcity. Shortages of all kinds have lingered and even worsened over the past 18 months, in every product imaginable: Hot tubs, automobiles, books, fertilizer, plastic pipettes for labs, paint, semiconductor chips, place mats, french fries at Burger King, emergency supplies for disaster aid, aluminum cans, and yes, once again, toilet paper.

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The Great Supply Shock We Brought Upon Ourselves

At least once over the past 18 months, when you tried to order something online or visited a retail store, you have probably experienced something Americans are not supposed to feel: scarcity. Shortages of all kinds have lingered and even worsened over the past 18 months, in every product imaginable: Hot tubs, automobiles, books, fertilizer, plastic pipettes for labs, paint, semiconductor chips, place mats, french fries at Burger King, emergency supplies for disaster aid, aluminum cans, and yes, once again, toilet paper.

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