A Video Leak Reveals the Use of Rape as Torture in Russian Prisons

An investigator visits Regional Tuberculosis Hospital No 1 under the Russian Federal Penitentiary Service, its staff charged with abusing convicts. Investigative Committee Office for Saratov Region. (Investigative CommitteeTASS via Getty Images)

Content warning: This article discusses torture and sexual assault in prison and includes graphic descriptions.

“They told me to take [their genitals] into my mouth, to suck,” an inmate from one of Russia’s correctional colonies told Novaya Gazeta in a recent interview.

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John Keats’s Politics of Pain and Renewal

“The Grave of Keats,” 1873 by Walter Crane. (Photo by Ashmolean Museum/Heritage Images/Getty Images)

Like a lot of people who get their understanding of the world from books, I fell in love twice when I was 20. I was introduced to Hart Crane’s poetry a few weeks after I met my wife, and I connected immediately with Crane’s depressive excess and with his precociousness—both tragic and goofy. He could be cruel, especially about those whose approval he craved, and he would inflate brief encounters into life-changing entanglements just to feel interesting.

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John Keats’s Politics of Pain and Renewal

“The Grave of Keats,” 1873 by Walter Crane. (Photo by Ashmolean Museum/Heritage Images/Getty Images)

Like a lot of people who get their understanding of the world from books, I fell in love twice when I was 20. I was introduced to Hart Crane’s poetry a few weeks after I met my wife, and I connected immediately with Crane’s depressive excess and with his precociousness—both tragic and goofy. He could be cruel, especially about those whose approval he craved, and he would inflate brief encounters into life-changing entanglements just to feel interesting.

Read original

John Keats’s Politics of Pain and Renewal

“The Grave of Keats,” 1873 by Walter Crane. (Photo by Ashmolean Museum/Heritage Images/Getty Images)

Like a lot of people who get their understanding of the world from books, I fell in love twice when I was 20. I was introduced to Hart Crane’s poetry a few weeks after I met my wife, and I connected immediately with Crane’s depressive excess and with his precociousness—both tragic and goofy. He could be cruel, especially about those whose approval he craved, and he would inflate brief encounters into life-changing entanglements just to feel interesting.

Read original

America as a “Shining City on a Hill”—and Other Myths to Die By

A doctor drawing blood from a patient as part of the Tuskegee Syphilis Study. (National Archives)

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The Malaria Vaccine Is a Welcome Step for a Disease Hastened by Environmentalism

The World Health Organization announced Wednesday that it has approved the first malaria vaccine. The disease, which is spread by mosquitoes and mostly affects people in sub-Saharan Africa, is one of the world’s deadliest. According to the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation at the University of Washington, it has killed over 15 million people, mostly children, since the turn of the century. For comparison, COVID-19 has killed almost 5 million people since the disease broke out in Wuhan, China, in 2019.

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Life Along The Border Collapses

Take all of the imagery you have seen of the over 14,000 Haitian migrants camped under an international bridge in the small Texas border town of Del Rio and add the complications of disease, public excrement, unbearable heat and heightened frustrations. It has led to violence that has injured Border Patrol officers.
Now close your eyes and imagine it is 100 times worse.
Because that’s what it is, said Texas Rep. Tony Gonzales, the freshman Republican who represents 42% of the border.

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Life Along The Border Collapses

Take all of the imagery you have seen of the over 14,000 Haitian migrants camped under an international bridge in the small Texas border town of Del Rio and add the complications of disease, public excrement, unbearable heat and heightened frustrations. It has led to violence that has injured Border Patrol officers.
Now close your eyes and imagine it is 100 times worse.
Because that’s what it is, said Texas Rep. Tony Gonzales, the freshman Republican who represents 42% of the border.

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