A reluctant warrior? An examination of Gen. Colin Powell’s bloody legacy from Iraq to Latin America

We look at the life and legacy of Colin Powell, who is best known for giving false testimony to the U.N. Security Council in 2003 about nonexistent weapons of mass destruction in Iraq, paving the way for the U.S. invasion and occupation that would kill over 1 million Iraqis. Powell, who was the first Black secretary of state, the first Black and youngest chair of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and the first Black national security adviser, died on Monday due to blood cancer and Parkinson’s disease that left him vulnerable to infection from COVID-19. Tributes poured in from top U.S.

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The Biden Administration’s Sanctions Review Is a Joke

Then–presidential candidate Joe Biden displayed on a television screen at a restaurant in Caracas, Venezuela, on November 4, 2020, amid the Covid-19 coronavirus pandemic. (Cristian Hernandez / AFP / Getty)

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Common Sense About America’s Appeal

Here’s a suggestion for thought: Constantly, nonstop, on the social media (really should be called the “anti-social media”) there are endless stories about how famous geniuses like Al Sharpton and Hillary Clinton have accused the United States of America of being a racist, fascistic, white skinned privilege super state.
We see this supposedly in the alleged police butchery of blacks, in the drastically different standards of living of blacks, “Anglos,” Asians, and Hispanics, and in the wildly different levels of academic achievement of different races.

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The media missed how a new military alliance threatens to take the world to the brink

Before it’s too late, we need to ask ourselves a crucial question: Do we really — I mean truly — want a new Cold War with China?
Because that’s just where the Biden administration is clearly taking us. If you need proof, check out last month’s announcement of an “AUKUS” (Australia, United Kingdom, U.S.) military alliance in Asia. Believe me, it’s far scarier (and more racist) than the nuclear-powered submarine deal and the French diplomatic kerfuffle that dominated the media coverage of it.

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The media missed how a new military alliance threatens to take the world to the brink

Before it’s too late, we need to ask ourselves a crucial question: Do we really — I mean truly — want a new Cold War with China?
Because that’s just where the Biden administration is clearly taking us. If you need proof, check out last month’s announcement of an “AUKUS” (Australia, United Kingdom, U.S.) military alliance in Asia. Believe me, it’s far scarier (and more racist) than the nuclear-powered submarine deal and the French diplomatic kerfuffle that dominated the media coverage of it.

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Were the Recent Haiti Kidnappings Business, Politics—or Both?

People protest for the release of kidnapped missionaries near the missionaries’ headquarters in Titanyen, north of Port-au-Prince, Haiti. (Joseph Odelyn / Associated Press)

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Were the Recent Haiti Kidnappings Business, Politics—or Both?

People protest for the release of kidnapped missionaries near the missionaries’ headquarters in Titanyen, north of Port-au-Prince, Haiti. (Joseph Odelyn / Associated Press)

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Were the Recent Haiti Kidnappings Business, Politics—or Both?

People protest for the release of kidnapped missionaries near the missionaries’ headquarters in Titanyen, north of Port-au-Prince, Haiti. (Joseph Odelyn / Associated Press)

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Biden’s own Supreme Court commission undercuts court-packing ambitions

Joe Biden sparked controversy during the 2020 presidential campaign when he refused to rule out “packing” the Supreme Court with additional justices to change its ideological composition. Caught between a progressive flank clamoring for the move and a deeply skeptical population, the president copped out by saying he would form a commission to study the idea. Now, eight months into Biden’s presidency, that commission has begun its work — and the results undercut the Left’s push to pack the court.

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Biden Continues Trump’s Devastating Sanctions

As President Biden took office in January, a complex lattice of U.S. sanctions hampered the ability of Iranians to get access to basic COVID treatments and supplies, like syringes, infusion pumps, and testing kits. Desperate doctors had been forced to plead with global audiences for relief.
While the full pandemic-era toll of U.S. sanctions is difficult to track, the Brookings Institution estimated that, between May and September of 2020, U.S. sanctions were responsible for an additional 13,000 deaths from COVID-19 in Iran alone. The full devastation is likely much greater, as U.S.

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