President Joe Hoover

Herbert Clark Hoover was, for the bulk of his career as a mining engineer and later administrator of various post-World War I food relief agencies as well as Secretary of Commerce in the Harding and Coolidge presidencies, considered a star. On that basis he was elected the 31st president in a popular vote landslide in 1928.
And then.
Then, in the fall of 1929, the stock market crashed and the American economy tanked. The Great Depression had begun — and American politics changed for decades. Herbert Hoover was made into a villain by his Democratic Party opposition.

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The ‘Year Two’ Curse

It’s common now for Democrats to argue that the agenda they are struggling to implement on Capitol Hill represents the party’s most ambitious since the “Great Society” Congress convened in 1965. That’s a reasonable assessment—but one that the party today should consider as much a warning as an inspiration. Under the relentless prodding of President Lyndon B. Johnson, the Democratic-controlled House and Senate passed landmark legislation at a dizzying pace during that legendary 1965–66 legislative session.

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Should Princeton Exist?

One recent fall morning at a coffee shop in Princeton, I overheard two students chatting about upcoming deadlines for the Rhodes, the Marshall, and the Mitchell—three prestigious postgraduate scholarships so coveted that they’ve become mononymous on elite campuses.
“I don’t love the Rhodes dude from the 1800s,” one student confessed to the other. “Wasn’t he, like, racist?”
Indeed.

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Who Really Runs Joe Biden’s White House? Believe It or Not: Joe Biden

President Joe Biden speaks as he meets with India’s Prime Minister Narendra Modi in the Oval Office at the White House in Washington, D.C., September 24, 2021. (Evelyn Hockstein/Reuters)
The president’s critics must stop letting him off the hook and treating him like the prisoner of Pennsylvania Avenue.
My fellow Republicans and conservatives have disappointed me lately. Yet again, the Right is too nice.
While my free-market friends count themselves among the president’s most fervent detractors, they nearly all make excuses for Biden.

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The Republican Senate Spending Bill Vote Was Sabotage

Yesterday every single Republican senator voted to shut down the U.S. government and provoke a global financial crisis.
Of course, they claimed otherwise; Mitch McConnell, the Senate minority leader, portrayed the vote against raising the debt limit as a test of Democrats’ ability to govern, and some of his colleagues claimed to be taking a stand for fiscal responsibility. But everyone involved understood that this was an act of political sabotage. And the terrible thing is that it might work.
The U.S.

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Democrats Are at War Over Joe Biden’s Agenda. Here’s One Big Idea That Could Save It.

Democrats are trying to solve a public policy riddle with stakes that couldn’t be higher. The party’s $3.5 trillion reconciliation bill is the last best chance for America to tackle the world’s rapidly escalating climate crisis. But moderates, led by Sens. Joe Manchin and Kyrsten Sinema, whose votes could single-handedly tank the legislation, have demanded deep cuts to the package’s price tag that would make it nearly impossible to spend enough tackling global warming while also addressing the party’s other priorities, such as child care and health care.

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Democrats Are at War Over Joe Biden’s Agenda. Here’s One Big Idea That Could Save It.

Democrats are trying to solve a public policy riddle with stakes that couldn’t be higher. The party’s $3.5 trillion reconciliation bill is the last best chance for America to tackle the world’s rapidly escalating climate crisis. But moderates, led by Sens. Joe Manchin and Kyrsten Sinema, whose votes could single-handedly tank the legislation, have demanded deep cuts to the package’s price tag that would make it nearly impossible to spend enough tackling global warming while also addressing the party’s other priorities, such as child care and health care.

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Direct Democracy Is Breaking California

The foolishness of California’s recall system—which failed this week to replace California Governor Gavin Newsom with a right-wing talk radio blowhard—is not a new story. It ought to have been made evident by the California election in 1910 that led to its creation. 
The Progressive Republican candidate for governor that year, a San Francisco prosecutor named Hiram Johnson, ran on the promise to “kick the Southern Pacific out of politics in California.” He succeeded almost before Election Day.

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The Deep Politics of Vaccine Mandates

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The debate over President Biden’s vaccine mandates has focused, understandably, on the tradeoff between individual rights to make medical choices and the potential harm the unvaccinated pose to others. That tradeoff is unavoidable. It is simply wrong for Biden to say, “It’s not about freedom.” It is. It is equally wrong for some Republican governors to say it is all about freedom. It’s also about the external effects of each person’s choice. To pretend that tradeoff doesn’t exist is demagoguery.

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The Deep Politics of Vaccine Mandates

X

Story Stream

recent articles

The debate over President Biden’s vaccine mandates has focused, understandably, on the tradeoff between individual rights to make medical choices and the potential harm the unvaccinated pose to others. That tradeoff is unavoidable. It is simply wrong for Biden to say, “It’s not about freedom.” It is. It is equally wrong for some Republican governors to say it is all about freedom. It’s also about the external effects of each person’s choice. To pretend that tradeoff doesn’t exist is demagoguery.

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