Challenging Georgia on Latino Voting Rights

Sergio Botello immigrated to Hall County, Georgia, from Mexico almost 30 years ago and recently became a citizen. His English is limited, and so when he was finally able to register to vote, he feared making unintentional mistakes that might attract the attention of county voting officials. He could not find sample ballots in Spanish, and he also lacked information about the issues and the candidates in his native language.

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Classroom Segregation Endures in North Carolina

At age seven, Sahmoi Stout began taking classes for gifted students. He had started first grade in the Chapel Hill-Carrboro City Schools, North Carolina’s best-performing school district, after his family moved to Chapel Hill from Durham. In second grade, a teacher recommended him for the academic program that ultimately propelled him to college. At first, Stout, who is African American, didn’t understand why his friends didn’t take those same courses. As one of the few Black students in advanced classes full of white kids, he “felt odd.

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Washington State to Shutter Private Detention Center

In March of 2014, after 21 months in detention, Hassall Moses landed in solitary confinement at the Northwest ICE Processing Center (NWIPC) in Washington state, run by the GEO Group, a private prison company. Moses was already in the middle of a hunger strike when he decided to write a letter to other detainees encouraging them to stop working to protest inedible food, abusive guards, and low pay for doing the facility’s cooking, cleaning, and maintenance. “This facility is run by detainees,” Moses said in an interview that his attorney recorded.

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Washington State to Shutter Private Detention Center

In March of 2014, after 21 months in detention, Hassall Moses landed in solitary confinement at the Northwest ICE Processing Center (NWIPC) in Washington state, run by the GEO Group, a private prison company. Moses was already in the middle of a hunger strike when he decided to write a letter to other detainees encouraging them to stop working to protest inedible food, abusive guards, and low pay for doing the facility’s cooking, cleaning, and maintenance. “This facility is run by detainees,” Moses said in an interview that his attorney recorded.

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