You Can Be a War Hawk or an Inflation Hawk, But You Can’t Be Both

Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell opposes the Build Back Better bill because it’s too inflationary, especially for the energy sector. It “would spend hundreds of billions of dollars on Green New Deal-type policies that would saddle families with even higher prices” for oil, he complained in November.
McConnell also thinks President Joe Biden is moving too slowly against Russia. “Whatever steps we are gonna take,” he said this week, “need to be taken before an invasion, not afterwards.

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The Smallness of Hanya Yanagihara’s Maximalist Novel

The maximalist novel, switching in its long narrative journey between different time periods or genres—or sometimes both—has over the years become something of a genre in itself. Even as a significant slice of literary fiction turns ever more slender and novella-like, too weary in its ennui to sketch out more than thoughts and emotions, a countercurrent exists in massive novels that purport to capture many things.

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How We Got From the Cold War to the Current Russian Standoff (and It’s Not All on Putin)

In December 1988, the leader of the Soviet Union made a remarkable announcement at the United Nations. Mikhail Gorbachev declared the unilateral withdrawal of half a million Soviet troops from countries in Eastern Europe. “Further world progress is now possible only through the search for a consensus of all mankind, in movement toward a new world order,” he said.
Just over 33 years later, U.S. leaders are considering sending thousands of troops to some of the same lands from which Soviet troops retreated.

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Hunter S. Thompson and the Four Secrets to Gonzo Journalism’s Success

Fifty years after the publication of Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, Hunter S. Thompson’s celebrity remains a durable fact. Yet there was nothing inevitable about his notoriety or the style that gave rise to it. Gonzo journalism—Thompson’s unique blend of hyperbolic commentary, satire, invective, hallucination, and media critique—developed unevenly, haphazardly, almost by accident. That body of work, and the rock-star celebrity it created, almost didn’t happen.

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Washington’s “Havana Syndrome” Promoters Have a Lot to Answer For

Earlier this month, the federal agency most beloved by national security reporters threw some cold water on a conspiracy theory that corner of the media ecosystem has been peddling for years: Per interim findings of a CIA investigation described widely by spokespeople, “Havana Syndrome” is not a sustained campaign targeting U.S. personnel with directed energy weapons around the world. (They did stipulate, however, that they can’t yet definitively rule out “attacks” in about two dozen cases out of hundreds, which smacks of a face-saving consolation prize for everyone involved.

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Stephen Miller Is Race-Baiting About Covid Treatments

Of all the pandemic-fighting elements in short supply, the situation with monoclonal antibodies, a potentially life-saving drug that’s effective against omicron, is particularly grim. Minnesota, a state of over five million, received fewer than 600 doses this week. There is another antibody drug that could protect immunocompromised people whose bodies would reject a vaccine—many of whom have remained on lockdown for close to two years—but it’s nearly impossible to find.

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Republicans Might Throw a Fit Over Biden’s Supreme Court Nominee but They’re Powerless to Stop It

With Justice Stephen Breyer’s announcement that he will retire at the end of this year’s Supreme Court term, Senate Democrats are already gearing up for what could be yet another potentially contentious confirmation process.
Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer said on Wednesday that he wanted to be “deliberate” in the process, but also “move quickly.” “We want to get this done as soon as possible,” Schumer said.

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Republicans Might Throw a Fit Over Biden’s Supreme Court Nominee but They’re Powerless to Stop It

With Justice Stephen Breyer’s announcement that he will retire at the end of this year’s Supreme Court term, Senate Democrats are already gearing up for what could be yet another potentially contentious confirmation process.
Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer said on Wednesday that he wanted to be “deliberate” in the process, but also “move quickly.” “We want to get this done as soon as possible,” Schumer said.

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No, Joe Biden Has Not Gone Too Far to the Left

There’s a new conventional wisdom emerging to explain the Biden administration’s bumpy first year: He’s “too far left.” Centrist lawmakers, Democratic strategists-turned-talking-heads, and Never Trump conservatives are all jumping on the bandwagon.
It’s curious, considering President Biden’s highest profile legislative failures didn’t break on his ability to achieve broad consensus among the party. They failed over the obstinance of just two centrist extremists.

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No, Joe Biden Has Not Gone Too Far to the Left

There’s a new conventional wisdom emerging to explain the Biden administration’s bumpy first year: He’s “too far left.” Centrist lawmakers, Democratic strategists-turned-talking-heads, and Never Trump conservatives are all jumping on the bandwagon.
It’s curious, considering President Biden’s highest profile legislative failures didn’t break on his ability to achieve broad consensus among the party. They failed over the obstinance of just two centrist extremists.

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