The End of Infant Adoption

Ever since I entered what can generously be called my “mid-30s,” doctors have asked about my pregnancy plans at every appointment. Because I’m career-minded and generally indecisive, I’ve always had a way of punting on this question, both in the doctor’s office and elsewhere. Well, we can always adopt, I’ll think, or say out loud to my similarly childless and wishy-washy friends. Adoption, after all, doesn’t depend on your oocyte quality. And, as we’ve heard a million times, there are so many babies out there who need a good home.
But that is not actually true.

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The End of Infant Adoption

Ever since I entered what can generously be called my “mid-30s,” doctors have asked about my pregnancy plans at every appointment. Because I’m career-minded and generally indecisive, I’ve always had a way of punting on this question, both in the doctor’s office and elsewhere. Well, we can always adopt, I’ll think, or say out loud to my similarly childless and wishy-washy friends. Adoption, after all, doesn’t depend on your oocyte quality. And, as we’ve heard a million times, there are so many babies out there who need a good home.
But that is not actually true.

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The controversial plan to bring jaguars back to the US

The cat was moving through southern Arizona’s mountains one night in early January when it appeared on a trail camera, eyes glowing in the flash. It was a male. Over the past five years, this jaguar had been seen north of the Mexico border dozens of times. And like most confirmed US jaguar sightings, the rare images of this elusive creature garnered local press coverage and social media buzz.
Roaming the borderlands, solitary jaguars have become celebrities with names like El Jefe (The Boss) and, in this case, Sombra (Shadow). The felines are memorialized in murals and at school parties.

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Getting a Covid test at Walgreens isn’t as much of a privacy risk as it used to be

Update, September 20: Several days after this story published, and after denying that its original page set-up was insecure, Walgreens added an authentication screen to its Covid-19 test confirmation pages, making it more difficult for bad actors to access the information. With the new authentication screen, anyone who wants to access the test confirmation pages must now enter the patient’s date of birth first. The multiple ad trackers are still present on the patient pages.

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Getting a Covid test at Walgreens isn’t as much of a privacy risk as it used to be

Update, September 20: Several days after this story published, and after denying that its original page set-up was insecure, Walgreens added an authentication screen to its Covid-19 test confirmation pages, making it more difficult for bad actors to access the information. With the new authentication screen, anyone who wants to access the test confirmation pages must now enter the patient’s date of birth first. The multiple ad trackers are still present on the patient pages.

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How Walgreens’ sloppy Covid-19 test registration system exposed patient data

If you got a Covid-19 test at Walgreens, your personal data — including your name, date of birth, gender identity, phone number, address, and email — was left on the open web for potentially anyone to see and for the multiple ad trackers on Walgreens’ site to collect. In some cases, even the results of these tests could be gleaned from that data.
The data exposure potentially affects millions of people who used — or continue to use — Walgreens’ Covid-19 testing services over the course of the pandemic.

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Granderson: Why the ‘great resignation’ of 2021 is a sign of hope

It’s been a tough week for America.
A dark week.
The attack at the airport in Kabul, Afghanistan, killed 13 U.S. service members, including Marine Rylee McCollum, who at 20, only knew this country at war. And because of war, his unborn child will never get to know him.
Meanwhile the debate over mask mandates has turned a number of school board meetings into hotbeds for anti-vax protests and nonsensical conspiracy theories. The fights are overshadowing the more important story: People are dying.

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U.S. Vaccine Mandate for Incoming Immigrants Takes Effect October 1

U.S. will require COVID-19 vaccines for immigrants and refugees. As of October 1, immigrant applicants for permanent resident status in the U.S. must be vaccinated against COVID-19, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has announced.
“COVID-19 vaccination now meets the vaccination criteria for applicants for refugee or immigrant status,” the CDC says.

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Editorial: State lawmakers are fumbling the chance to improve patient safety

The lobbying group for state physicians is having its way with the state Legislature this year, neutering two bills aimed at improving patient safety. Unless lawmakers suddenly reverse course, they’re poised to punt on the chance to upgrade the state board that disciplines bad doctors, and they’ll defang a proposal to require doctors to reveal potential conflicts of interest to the people they treat.

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5 Products Scouted Readers Bought Most of This July

This July, I went to the beach. I went on a hike. I had a picnic. Everything I missed out on from last year, you better believe I did it. And it seems like you all were up to similar things. From hiking boots to sun hats, our readers favorite products ranged from everything we needed to get outside and enjoy ourselves. Without further adieu, we present you with what you, our dear readers, bought most of this July.
Packable Sun Hat: Scouted Editor Jillian Lucas is obsessed with this sun hat, and you should be too. It’s almost comically big, and yet it packs down to almost nothing.

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