China’s Bullying Is Becoming a Danger to the World and Itself

Indeed, TSMC and its South Korean rival Samsung have the only foundries in the world able to make the most advanced 5-nanometer chips, and TSMC is expected to begin next-generation 3-nanometer chips in 2022. The smaller the chip’s transistors, the more brain power you can pack onto it. China’s biggest chip maker, Semiconductor Manufacturing International Corporation, is not even close. It is mainly competing at 28 nanometers and just starting to produce some 14-nanometer chips.
I recently spent time in Silicon Valley asking U.S.

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When the Chips Are Down, We Need an Industrial Policy

Anyone who doubts the importance of the U.S. getting control of its supply chains should take a close look at the latest knock-on effects of the semiconductor shortage.
Computer chips are used in virtually all products other than what you can buy at a farmers’ market. And the dislocations of the pandemic have produced a massive shortage of chips.
Modern cars are heavily computerized. One effect of the chip shortage, among many, is that automakers have had to sharply cut production of new cars.
That in turn has made used cars a second-best substitute.

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A Silicon Curtain Descends

In a speech delivered almost exactly one year before the 2020 election, Vice President Mike Pence outlined the stakes of a potential tech cold war between the United States and China.
China had “smashed the barriers between civilian and military technological domains,” Pence said at the Woodrow Wilson International Center, just around the corner from the White House. “By law and presidential fiat, companies in China—whether private, state-owned, or foreign—must share their technologies with the Chinese military,” Pence said.

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