Why Are Ex-lawmakers Convicted of Corruption Still Receiving Federal Pensions?

(Evgen_Prozhyrko/Getty Images)
Washington bureaucrats have stymied efforts to ensure that a law against the practice is being enforced.
Members of Congress convicted of corruption should be legally prohibited from receiving taxpayer money. This is simple common sense, as even Congress itself agrees. Yet federal bureaucrats have stymied efforts to make it so.
After several high-profile scandals involving politicians, the Honest Leadership and Open Government Act (HLOGA) of 2007 specified corruption-related crimes that would lead to the loss of a lawmaker’s congressional pension.

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Why Are Ex-lawmakers Convicted of Corruption Still Receiving Federal Pensions?

(Evgen_Prozhyrko/Getty Images)
Washington bureaucrats have stymied efforts to ensure that a law against the practice is being enforced.
Members of Congress convicted of corruption should be legally prohibited from receiving taxpayer money. This is simple common sense, as even Congress itself agrees. Yet federal bureaucrats have stymied efforts to make it so.
After several high-profile scandals involving politicians, the Honest Leadership and Open Government Act (HLOGA) of 2007 specified corruption-related crimes that would lead to the loss of a lawmaker’s congressional pension.

Read original

Why Are Ex-lawmakers Convicted of Corruption Still Receiving Federal Pensions?

(Evgen_Prozhyrko/Getty Images)
Washington bureaucrats have stymied efforts to ensure that a law against the practice is being enforced.
Members of Congress convicted of corruption should be legally prohibited from receiving taxpayer money. This is simple common sense, as even Congress itself agrees. Yet federal bureaucrats have stymied efforts to make it so.
After several high-profile scandals involving politicians, the Honest Leadership and Open Government Act (HLOGA) of 2007 specified corruption-related crimes that would lead to the loss of a lawmaker’s congressional pension.

Read original

Why Are Ex-lawmakers Convicted of Corruption Still Receiving Federal Pensions?

(Evgen_Prozhyrko/Getty Images)
Washington bureaucrats have stymied efforts to ensure that a law against the practice is being enforced.
Members of Congress convicted of corruption should be legally prohibited from receiving taxpayer money. This is simple common sense, as even Congress itself agrees. Yet federal bureaucrats have stymied efforts to make it so.
After several high-profile scandals involving politicians, the Honest Leadership and Open Government Act (HLOGA) of 2007 specified corruption-related crimes that would lead to the loss of a lawmaker’s congressional pension.

Read original