Ursula Le Guin’s Radical Utopias Still Resonate Today

“You cannot buy the revolution. You cannot make the revolution. You can only be the revolution.” This is the core of the message that the anarchist Shevek proclaims to a mass demonstration of syndicalist and socialist workers gathered in Capitol Square in the city of Nio Esseia on the planet of Urras in Ursula K. Le Guin’s classic 1974 utopian novel The Disposessed.

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Invisible General: How Colin Powell Conned America

There were many worse American generals in the last century than Colin Powell, men who also died, like Powell, largely celebrated for their accomplishments. Curtis LeMay (firebombed Tokyo; nearly incited a third world war on multiple occasions), Douglas MacArthur (provoked the Korean War; attempted to start nuclear war), and perhaps Tommy Franks (oversaw the invasion of Iraq), to name a few.
But Powell was uniquely bad, fundamentally a bureaucrat and public relations man for the American political and military establishment.

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Why North Korea Is Test-Launching Missiles From a Submarine and a Train

In the last month, North Korea has test-launched seven different kinds of missiles. One of them carried a hypersonic glider, one was launched from a train, one was fired from a submarine, and another was a missile with the range to hit any spot in the United States. What is going on?
First, a few caveats. The North Koreans haven’t produced these missiles in large number (or, in most cases, any number). They haven’t loaded any of them with nuclear weapons and haven’t demonstrated an ability to make a nuclear warhead small enough to fit in a missile’s nosecone.

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Why North Korea Is Test-Launching Missiles From a Submarine and a Train

In the last month, North Korea has test-launched seven different kinds of missiles. One of them carried a hypersonic glider, one was launched from a train, one was fired from a submarine, and another was a missile with the range to hit any spot in the United States. What is going on?
First, a few caveats. The North Koreans haven’t produced these missiles in large number (or, in most cases, any number). They haven’t loaded any of them with nuclear weapons and haven’t demonstrated an ability to make a nuclear warhead small enough to fit in a missile’s nosecone.

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The media missed how a new military alliance threatens to take the world to the brink

Before it’s too late, we need to ask ourselves a crucial question: Do we really — I mean truly — want a new Cold War with China?
Because that’s just where the Biden administration is clearly taking us. If you need proof, check out last month’s announcement of an “AUKUS” (Australia, United Kingdom, U.S.) military alliance in Asia. Believe me, it’s far scarier (and more racist) than the nuclear-powered submarine deal and the French diplomatic kerfuffle that dominated the media coverage of it.

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The media missed how a new military alliance threatens to take the world to the brink

Before it’s too late, we need to ask ourselves a crucial question: Do we really — I mean truly — want a new Cold War with China?
Because that’s just where the Biden administration is clearly taking us. If you need proof, check out last month’s announcement of an “AUKUS” (Australia, United Kingdom, U.S.) military alliance in Asia. Believe me, it’s far scarier (and more racist) than the nuclear-powered submarine deal and the French diplomatic kerfuffle that dominated the media coverage of it.

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Rewards for freedom of thought

If the North Korean regime ever collapses on its own, the Nobel Peace Prize ought to go to this group: older people in North Korea. According to Radio Free Asia, these citizens are now banned from parks and other public places because they criticize the regime too much during their daily chats. After decades of forcefully stifling dissent, the regime can’t seem to banish freedom of thought.
That such a freedom exists widely in North Korea is a testament to the power of universal truth in individual conscience and to the liberty that enables each person to see others as free.

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NATO puts clothes, not meat, on its strategic bones

Defense ministers from NATO’s 30 member states are meeting at the alliance’s headquarters in Brussels.
Led by the capable Secretary-General Jens Stoltenberg, the alliance is trying to evolve. Recognizing China’s preeminent threat to the democratic international order that NATO stands for, the alliance is paying more attention to Beijing (albeit to the chagrin of France, which worries about losing Chinese trade).
The alliance is also focused on better deterring the threat posed by Russia.

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NATO puts clothes, not meat, on its strategic bones

Defense ministers from NATO’s 30 member states are meeting at the alliance’s headquarters in Brussels.
Led by the capable Secretary-General Jens Stoltenberg, the alliance is trying to evolve. Recognizing China’s preeminent threat to the democratic international order that NATO stands for, the alliance is paying more attention to Beijing (albeit to the chagrin of France, which worries about losing Chinese trade).
The alliance is also focused on better deterring the threat posed by Russia.

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The Second Amendment vs. the Seventh Amendment: Procedural Rights and the Problem of Incorporation

This is the fourth in a series of five posts based on my piece in the Northwestern Law Review comparing the Second and Seventh Amendment. The last post described the distinction between substantive and procedural rights, and the importance of that distinction. In this post, I look more closely at the problem of procedural rights and explain how they block important reforms.
The U.S. Supreme Court’s struggles over whether to apply the first eight amendments of the Constitution to the states illustrate the problem with procedural rights.

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