Lebanon’s “National Financial Suicide”

A Lebanese prosecutor on May 18 charged the director of monetary operations at the central bank, Mazen Hamdane, with manipulating the exchange rate, a judicial source said, as the country struggles with a major currency crisis. (Patrick Baz / Getty Images)

Look in the archives, and the signs are there. In summer 2018, the Banque du Liban (BDL) celebrated its 55th anniversary. It also marked Riad Salameh’s 25th year at the institution’s helm; the government has repeatedly reappointed him every six years, an exceptionally long tenure for the head of a central bank.

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All Your Questions About Justice League’s Very Long, Very Wild Snyder Cut, Answered

Let’s start with the basics. What actually is the Snyder Cut?
It’s a four-hour version of the 2017 superhero film Justice League that adheres more closely to the vision of Zack Snyder, the movie’s original director. Snyder had to step down during postproduction, and the film was finished by Joss Whedon, who rewrote it and oversaw extensive reshoots. It’s coming to HBO Max on Thursday.
Has anyone seen it yet? And is Tom & Jerry involved somehow?

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Critics have seen Snyder’s cut, although the first reviews won’t be up until Monday.

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Today, We’re All Living in Mad Max’s World

It’s been forty-two years since Max Rockatansky burst onto screens in the first Mad Max film. Since then, director George Miller’s postapocalyptic vision, explored over the course of four enduringly popular films, has generated a common language to describe a ravaged future.
Miller cobbled together the wasteland setting, post-punk costumes, weapons, and machines from discarded parts of our own world. The phrase “Mad Max” itself has become shorthand for violent social breakdown.

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Today, We’re All Living in Mad Max’s World

It’s been forty-two years since Max Rockatansky burst onto screens in the first Mad Max film. Since then, director George Miller’s postapocalyptic vision, explored over the course of four enduringly popular films, has generated a common language to describe a ravaged future.
Miller cobbled together the wasteland setting, post-punk costumes, weapons, and machines from discarded parts of our own world. The phrase “Mad Max” itself has become shorthand for violent social breakdown.

Read original

Today, We’re All Living in Mad Max’s World

It’s been forty-two years since Max Rockatansky burst onto screens in the first Mad Max film. Since then, director George Miller’s postapocalyptic vision, explored over the course of four enduringly popular films, has generated a common language to describe a ravaged future.
Miller cobbled together the wasteland setting, post-punk costumes, weapons, and machines from discarded parts of our own world. The phrase “Mad Max” itself has become shorthand for violent social breakdown.

Read original

Hugh Keays-Byrne Showed Us the Danger of Demagoguery and the Promise of Solidarity

Acclaimed actor Hugh Keays-Byrne died this week at the age of seventy-three. Enthusiastic tributes to the kindness of a man known for his on-screen cruelty dutifully poured in. When director Brian Trenchard-Smith announced his friend’s death last Thursday, he wrote that Keays-Byrne “cared about social justice and preserving the environment long before these issues became fashionable. His life was governed by his sense of the oneness of humanity.”
Keays-Byrne was born in India, but moved to Australia in 1973 after touring there to perform.

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Hugh Keays-Byrne Showed Us the Danger of Demagoguery and the Promise of Solidarity

Acclaimed actor Hugh Keays-Byrne died this week at the age of seventy-three. Enthusiastic tributes to the kindness of a man known for his on-screen cruelty dutifully poured in. When director Brian Trenchard-Smith announced his friend’s death last Thursday, he wrote that Keays-Byrne “cared about social justice and preserving the environment long before these issues became fashionable. His life was governed by his sense of the oneness of humanity.”
Keays-Byrne was born in India, but moved to Australia in 1973 after touring there to perform.

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Hugh Keays-Byrne Showed Us the Danger of Demagoguery and the Promise of Solidarity

Acclaimed actor Hugh Keays-Byrne died this week at the age of seventy-three. Enthusiastic tributes to the kindness of a man known for his on-screen cruelty dutifully poured in. When director Brian Trenchard-Smith announced his friend’s death last Thursday, he wrote that Keays-Byrne “cared about social justice and preserving the environment long before these issues became fashionable. His life was governed by his sense of the oneness of humanity.”
Keays-Byrne was born in India, but moved to Australia in 1973 after touring there to perform.

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The Future of the House Republicans Is Fully Unhinged

Supporters of President Donald Trump at a campaign rally in Las Vegas on Feb. 21. Mario Tama/Getty Images
After winning a runoff for the Republican nomination in Georgia’s 14th Congressional District Tuesday night, Marjorie Taylor Greene delivered a message for her soon-to-be colleague in the House, Speaker Nancy Pelosi.
“She’s a hypocrite,” Greene said. “She’s anti-American.

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Bacurau Is the Most Must-See Movie Since Parasite

It’s a rare event when you can run to all your socialist friends and urge them to watch a movie that’s a thrilling crowd-pleaser. We must face the fact that, usually, leftists are recommending solemn and informative documentaries to each other, or grim biographies of people who stand out in history because they once had a social conscience and did something about it — and probably paid a high price. And of course, there are always dark indie dramas about oppression, plus Ken Loach films. Our feel-bad movies are generally stuck on the fringes of international media.

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