The Curious Case of the Waukesha ‘Killer Car’

Darrell Brooks poses for a booking photograph at the Milwaukee County Jail in Milwaukee, Wis., November 3, 2021. (Milwaukee County Sheriff’s Office/Handout via Reuters)
Welcome back to “Forgotten Fact-Checks,” a weekly column produced by National Review’s News Desk. This week, we investigate the curious case of the “killer car,” check in on how some progressive commentators celebrated Thanksgiving, and explore more media misses.

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Ahmaud Arbery and the Legacy of White Fear

If the casual brutality heaped on enslaved people is so much ancient history that it numbs the mind, reflect for a minute on what Ahmaud Arbery suffered in his last moments: horrific chest, armpit wounds, and a detached wrist. Three white men pleaded self-defense as they tried to make a so-called “citizen’s arrest,” for what they perceived to be the crime of roaming around a partially built house. A jury of their peers, who were all white, save one, disagreed.

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Trump Never Got Another Classified Intelligence Briefing After Jan. 6

After a holiday break where he didn’t receive a classified intelligence briefing, President Donald Trump was supposed to get one on Jan. 6, 2021—the day he incited a violent attack on the U.S. Capitol. It didn’t happen. And then he didn’t get one for the rest of his presidency.
That unusual stretch where the president didn’t receive a regular classified briefing is recounted in the latest version of a book published and regularly revised by the Central Intelligence Agency, which describes how spies update presidents on national security matters.

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The ‘Visible Deterioration’ in American Democracy Is Just the Start

While many in the media and political landscape are distracted by the phantom menace of wokeness, the US was just added to an annual list of “backsliding” democracies for the first time ever.
It’s an urgent reminder to Americans battling windmills like Critical Race Theory and The 1619 project, and desperately rehabilitating former Trump officials, that we have less than a year to try and save our ailing Republic from an increasingly radicalized and weaponized GOP death cult.

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Granderson: Who else has been terrorized and killed by police where Ahmaud Arbery was murdered?

Caroline Small was just 35 years old when she died.
Already struggling with mental health issues as well as drug and alcohol addiction, it is believed her divorce, which had just been finalized days earlier, contributed to her poor state of mind when a Glynn County officer approached her as she sat in her running car. Someone had called police believing Small was doing drugs.
This was June 18, 2010.
When the officer asked her to step out of the vehicle, Small drove off and, for four miles, led officers on a low-speed chase.

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The Guilty Verdicts in the Ahmaud Arbery Case Are a Welcome Respite

All three defendants in the killing of Ahmaud Arbery were found guilty of murder.
Arbery was jogging through a South Georgia neighborhood. The men formed a posse that became what has been described as a “lynch mob.” They stalked Arbery, hunted him down, insisted on detaining him, and then one of the men — Travis McMichael — blasted him three times with a shotgun.
It was caught on video, ironically by one of the men now convicted of the murder.
The guilty verdicts landed oddly for me. This was the right decision, the way it should have gone.

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Project Censored, Part 2: The New Normal Is More Normalized Censorship

Project Censored’s State of the Free Press 2022, edited by Andy Lee Roth and Mickey Huff, is available for preorder now. Published in collaboration with Random Lengths News, this is the second of two parts. Read the first five stories on the list here. 
6. Canary Mission Blacklists Pro-Palestinian Activists, Chilling Free-Speech Rights
Before the “critical race theory” moral panic fueled a nationwide uprising to censor discussions of race in education, there was an opposite moral panic decrying “cancel culture” stifling certain people—especially in education.

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Challenging Georgia on Latino Voting Rights

Sergio Botello immigrated to Hall County, Georgia, from Mexico almost 30 years ago and recently became a citizen. His English is limited, and so when he was finally able to register to vote, he feared making unintentional mistakes that might attract the attention of county voting officials. He could not find sample ballots in Spanish, and he also lacked information about the issues and the candidates in his native language.

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