The Biden Administration’s Medicaid-Expansion Scheme

(Zoran Zeremski/iStock/Getty Images)
Focusing on merely expanding ‘health coverage’ will do nothing to address the inadequate supply of health care in states such as North Carolina.
Medicaid-expansion discussions have accelerated in North Carolina as the governor and the General Assembly attempt to come to a final agreement on a general-fund budget for the biennium.

Read original

The Biden Administration’s Medicaid-Expansion Scheme

(Zoran Zeremski/iStock/Getty Images)
Focusing on merely expanding ‘health coverage’ will do nothing to address the inadequate supply of health care in states such as North Carolina.
Medicaid-expansion discussions have accelerated in North Carolina as the governor and the General Assembly attempt to come to a final agreement on a general-fund budget for the biennium.

Read original

Editorial: An injustice of miscarriage in Oklahoma lands a woman in prison

Criminalizing a woman for suffering a miscarriage seems unfathomable and even barbaric. But that is exactly what happened earlier this month in a Lawton, Okla., courtroom.
When Brittney Poolaw, a Oklahoma woman, miscarried at her home in January 2020, she was taken to a hospital where she told staff that she had used methamphetamine and marijuana during her pregnancy. Two months later, she was charged with first-degree manslaughter. Her pregnancy was 17 weeks along.

Read original

Who Killed Colin Powell?

In the past two weeks, COVID-19 has struck three well-known people. Former Secretary of State Colin Powell, who had been fully vaccinated, died on Monday due to complications from the virus. Meanwhile, two men who had refused vaccination—conservative radio talk show host Dennis Prager and Texas gubernatorial candidate Allen West—caught the virus but survived. On Fox News, these stories are being exploited to cast doubt on COVID vaccines and to suggest that people should rely instead on “natural immunity” or therapeutic drugs.

Read original

Op-Ed: The economic recovery can benefit all Americans. Here’s how

The expiration of enhanced unemployment benefits in the United States has come and gone with no noticeable impact on the number of Americans seeking work. This should come as no surprise. Arguments made by uninformed and self-interested low-wage employers who blamed the pandemic-era safety net for their inability to fill open positions never held water. Research from the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco has shown that early suspension of benefits in some states had no noticeable impact on their unemployment rates.

Read original

Kaiser Wants to Cut Health Care Workers’ Wages. It Might Provoke a Massive Strike.

At midnight on September 30, the national agreement expired between Kaiser Permanente and the Alliance of Health Care Unions: twenty-one locals representing 52,000 workers. Now, 35,000 of them have authorized strikes.
The heart of the conflict is a two-tier wage proposal, a rarity in health care. The company wants to create regional wage scales for everyone hired after 2022 — meaning a giant cut in pay.
Kaiser isn’t hurting financially; last year it netted $6.4 billion, and it even returned $500 million in CARES Act funding to the federal government.

Read original

Kaiser Wants to Cut Health Care Workers’ Wages. It Might Provoke a Massive Strike.

At midnight on September 30, the national agreement expired between Kaiser Permanente and the Alliance of Health Care Unions: twenty-one locals representing 52,000 workers. Now, 35,000 of them have authorized strikes.
The heart of the conflict is a two-tier wage proposal, a rarity in health care. The company wants to create regional wage scales for everyone hired after 2022 — meaning a giant cut in pay.
Kaiser isn’t hurting financially; last year it netted $6.4 billion, and it even returned $500 million in CARES Act funding to the federal government.

Read original

Kaiser Wants to Cut Health Care Workers’ Wages. It Might Provoke a Massive Strike.

At midnight on September 30, the national agreement expired between Kaiser Permanente and the Alliance of Health Care Unions: twenty-one locals representing 52,000 workers. Now, 35,000 of them have authorized strikes.
The heart of the conflict is a two-tier wage proposal, a rarity in health care. The company wants to create regional wage scales for everyone hired after 2022 — meaning a giant cut in pay.
Kaiser isn’t hurting financially; last year it netted $6.4 billion, and it even returned $500 million in CARES Act funding to the federal government.

Read original

Kaiser Wants to Cut Health Care Workers’ Wages. It Might Provoke a Massive Strike.

At midnight on September 30, the national agreement expired between Kaiser Permanente and the Alliance of Health Care Unions: twenty-one locals representing 52,000 workers. Now, 35,000 of them have authorized strikes.
The heart of the conflict is a two-tier wage proposal, a rarity in health care. The company wants to create regional wage scales for everyone hired after 2022 — meaning a giant cut in pay.
Kaiser isn’t hurting financially; last year it netted $6.4 billion, and it even returned $500 million in CARES Act funding to the federal government.

Read original

Kaiser Wants to Cut Health Care Workers’ Wages. It Might Provoke a Massive Strike.

At midnight on September 30, the national agreement expired between Kaiser Permanente and the Alliance of Health Care Unions: twenty-one locals representing 52,000 workers. Now, 35,000 of them have authorized strikes.
The heart of the conflict is a two-tier wage proposal, a rarity in health care. The company wants to create regional wage scales for everyone hired after 2022 — meaning a giant cut in pay.
Kaiser isn’t hurting financially; last year it netted $6.4 billion, and it even returned $500 million in CARES Act funding to the federal government.

Read original