Invisible General: How Colin Powell Conned America

There were many worse American generals in the last century than Colin Powell, men who also died, like Powell, largely celebrated for their accomplishments. Curtis LeMay (firebombed Tokyo; nearly incited a third world war on multiple occasions), Douglas MacArthur (provoked the Korean War; attempted to start nuclear war), and perhaps Tommy Franks (oversaw the invasion of Iraq), to name a few.
But Powell was uniquely bad, fundamentally a bureaucrat and public relations man for the American political and military establishment.

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A reluctant warrior? An examination of Gen. Colin Powell’s bloody legacy from Iraq to Latin America

We look at the life and legacy of Colin Powell, who is best known for giving false testimony to the U.N. Security Council in 2003 about nonexistent weapons of mass destruction in Iraq, paving the way for the U.S. invasion and occupation that would kill over 1 million Iraqis. Powell, who was the first Black secretary of state, the first Black and youngest chair of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and the first Black national security adviser, died on Monday due to blood cancer and Parkinson’s disease that left him vulnerable to infection from COVID-19. Tributes poured in from top U.S.

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Dems’ vaccine mandates for police are bound to backfire

In the media narrative, those resisting the vaccine mandates are all Trump-supporting snake handlers from Appalachia, or something like that. But real life, as happens so often, doesn’t track the media narrative.
In fact, much of the resistance comes from people like airline pilots, health professionals and air-traffic controllers, none of whom can fit the stereotype of uneducated rubes.
But perhaps the most interesting and determined resistance to vaccine mandates comes from those who are usually tasked with enforcing government mandates: police.

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The Biden White House ‘stove-piped’ school board parents and protesters

Have you heard of “stove-piping ”?
It’s a laundering technique government officials use to justify taking action against certain targets. It’s the one federal operatives used to sell WMDs . It’s the one they used to sell the yearslong Russian collusion dud.
More recently, it’s the one the Biden administration appears to have used to justify mobilizing the full weight of the federal law enforcement apparatus against parents who oppose school masking policies and the teaching of critical race theory.
Attorney General Merrick Garland announced on Oct.

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The media missed how a new military alliance threatens to take the world to the brink

Before it’s too late, we need to ask ourselves a crucial question: Do we really — I mean truly — want a new Cold War with China?
Because that’s just where the Biden administration is clearly taking us. If you need proof, check out last month’s announcement of an “AUKUS” (Australia, United Kingdom, U.S.) military alliance in Asia. Believe me, it’s far scarier (and more racist) than the nuclear-powered submarine deal and the French diplomatic kerfuffle that dominated the media coverage of it.

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The media missed how a new military alliance threatens to take the world to the brink

Before it’s too late, we need to ask ourselves a crucial question: Do we really — I mean truly — want a new Cold War with China?
Because that’s just where the Biden administration is clearly taking us. If you need proof, check out last month’s announcement of an “AUKUS” (Australia, United Kingdom, U.S.) military alliance in Asia. Believe me, it’s far scarier (and more racist) than the nuclear-powered submarine deal and the French diplomatic kerfuffle that dominated the media coverage of it.

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The problem with Colin Powell’s UN speech wasn’t what you think

After Colin Powell died this week, almost every obituary highlighted not only his military leadership and service to multiple presidents, but also his speech before the United Nations. Yes, the speech alleging that Saddam Hussein’s Iraq had weapons of mass destruction and laying out the rationale for the U.S.-led invasion of Iraq just weeks later.
When subsequent events showed the intelligence Powell cited to be wrong, he acknowledged the episode was a “blot” on his record.

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Colin Powell: a career marked by Faustian bargains in service of war | Cynthia A Young

OpinionColin Powell

Colin Powell: a career marked by Faustian bargains in service of war

Cynthia A Young

Unlike many Black military men before him, Powell behaved just as the white leaders had: waging war when and where he was told to do so

‘Again and again throughout his storied rise, Powell made Faustian bargains, publicly endorsing military excursions, including both Iraq wars, that he privately admitted were risky enterprises.

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Colin Powell: a career marked by Faustian bargains in service of war | Cynthia A Young

OpinionColin Powell

Colin Powell: a career marked by Faustian bargains in service of war

Cynthia A Young

Unlike many Black military men before him, Powell behaved just as the white leaders had: waging war when and where he was told to do so

‘Again and again throughout his storied rise, Powell made Faustian bargains, publicly endorsing military excursions, including both Iraq wars, that he privately admitted were risky enterprises.

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A General Who Failed in War Assesses Risk

General Stanley McChrystal in Kabul, Afghanistan, in 2009. (Omar Sobhani/Reuters)
To judge from Stanley McChrystal’s new book, he remains blind to his error of ordering a strategy that his soldiers in Afghanistan could not comprehend or execute.
Risk: A User’s Guide, by Stanley McChrystal and Anna Butrico (Penguin, 368 pages, $30)
In 1950, General MacArthur took a huge strategic risk that changed the course of the Korean War, landing Marines in the rear of the North Korean soldiers and forcing them to retreat.

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