Two lies and Katie Couric

An Outright Lie
The Associated Press has taken a side in the endless debate over Netflix’s release of a comedy special that includes jokes about the transgender community, coming down squarely in favor of transgender activists.
And by “coming down squarely in favor of transgender activists,” I mean the Associated Press is now publishing baldfaced lies.
A handful of Netflix employees staged a walkout on Oct. 20 to protest the company’s release of a comedy special featuring comedian Dave Chappelle, who has both praise and criticism for the transgender community.

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Neither side should expect dramatic shifts — even if Supremes scrap Roe v. Wade

Texas Right to Life says SB8, the state law that prohibits abortion after fetal cardiac activity can be detected, has “saved at least 100 lives PER DAY” since it took effect on Sept. 1. Another calculation suggests the number “could be as high as 132.”
One reason for the uncertainty is that Texas women who have crossed SB8’s legal threshold, which typically happens around six weeks into a pregnancy, can still obtain abortions in other states with less restrictive policies.

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Neither side should expect dramatic shifts — even if Supremes scrap Roe v. Wade

Texas Right to Life says SB8, the state law that prohibits abortion after fetal cardiac activity can be detected, has “saved at least 100 lives PER DAY” since it took effect on Sept. 1. Another calculation suggests the number “could be as high as 132.”
One reason for the uncertainty is that Texas women who have crossed SB8’s legal threshold, which typically happens around six weeks into a pregnancy, can still obtain abortions in other states with less restrictive policies.

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How New York overengineered its million-dollar vaccine passport

New York’s Excelsior Pass is getting more popular. Since it launched in March, the digital vaccine platform has issued millions of passes, which allow people to display proof of vaccination or negative test results via an app developed by the state. But not many businesses are using the Excelsior Pass’s signature feature: a scannable QR code that can quickly verify customers’ vaccination status by checking state records.

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The Second Amendment vs. the Seventh Amendment: Procedural Rights and the Problem of Incorporation

This is the fourth in a series of five posts based on my piece in the Northwestern Law Review comparing the Second and Seventh Amendment. The last post described the distinction between substantive and procedural rights, and the importance of that distinction. In this post, I look more closely at the problem of procedural rights and explain how they block important reforms.
The U.S. Supreme Court’s struggles over whether to apply the first eight amendments of the Constitution to the states illustrate the problem with procedural rights.

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The Second Amendment vs. the Seventh Amendment: Procedural Rights and the Problem of Incorporation

This is the fourth in a series of five posts based on my piece in the Northwestern Law Review comparing the Second and Seventh Amendment. The last post described the distinction between substantive and procedural rights, and the importance of that distinction. In this post, I look more closely at the problem of procedural rights and explain how they block important reforms.
The U.S. Supreme Court’s struggles over whether to apply the first eight amendments of the Constitution to the states illustrate the problem with procedural rights.

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The Second Amendment vs. the Seventh Amendment: Procedural Rights and the Problem of Incorporation

This is the fourth in a series of five posts based on my piece in the Northwestern Law Review comparing the Second and Seventh Amendment. The last post described the distinction between substantive and procedural rights, and the importance of that distinction. In this post, I look more closely at the problem of procedural rights and explain how they block important reforms.
The U.S. Supreme Court’s struggles over whether to apply the first eight amendments of the Constitution to the states illustrate the problem with procedural rights.

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Americans don’t have faith in the US supreme court any more. That has justices worried | Russ Feingold

OpinionUS supreme court

Americans no longer have faith in the US supreme court. That has justices worried

Russ Feingold

The justices are vulnerable to public pressure in support of court reform. That’s why we must continue to push for change

Mandatory Credit: Photo by Bonnie Cash/UPI/REX/Shutterstock (12523811p) The US Supreme Court on the first day of their new term in Washington, DC., on Monday, October 4, 2021.

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Americans don’t have faith in the US supreme court any more. That has justices worried | Russ Feingold

OpinionUS supreme court

Americans no longer have faith in the US supreme court. That has justices worried

Russ Feingold

The justices are vulnerable to public pressure in support of court reform. That’s why we must continue to push for change

Mandatory Credit: Photo by Bonnie Cash/UPI/REX/Shutterstock (12523811p) The US Supreme Court on the first day of their new term in Washington, DC., on Monday, October 4, 2021.

Read original

Americans don’t have faith in the US supreme court any more. That has justices worried | Russ Feingold

OpinionUS supreme court

Americans no longer have faith in the US supreme court. That has justices worried

Russ Feingold

The justices are vulnerable to public pressure in support of court reform. That’s why we must continue to push for change

Mandatory Credit: Photo by Bonnie Cash/UPI/REX/Shutterstock (12523811p) The US Supreme Court on the first day of their new term in Washington, DC., on Monday, October 4, 2021.

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