Why Nixon Will Never Get His Rightful Place in History

Winston Churchill once remarked that history would treat him well because he intended to write the history. And he did. Churchill’s histories of the first and second world wars — 17 volumes in all — frame those conflicts to place his decisions and judgments in the best possible light. Churchill achieved his goal: history has treated him well, mostly because he deserved it.
Richard Nixon, after resigning the presidency on August 8, 1974, also worked tirelessly to rehabilitate his historical reputation.

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Blinken Outrageous

On Tuesday, the UN Human Rights Council resolved to address systemic racism against Africans and people of African descent in the context of law enforcement. It was, as is usual for the UN, a setup to bash the United States.
By no coincidence, on that same day, Secretary of State Antony Blinken invited the UNHRC to formally investigate “the scourge of racism, racial discrimination, and xenophobia” in the United States.

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Column: How two events 50 years ago today helped define the 1960s

On this day 50 years ago, U.S. Army Lt. William Calley was found guilty of committing 22 premeditated murders during a massacre by U.S. forces in the Vietnamese hamlet of My Lai. A platoon leader who had led his soldiers into the undefended village, Calley stood ramrod stiff as he listened to the jury’s verdict in his court martial. Face flushed, he offered a crooked salute after the verdict was read.

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We Can’t Fight the Far Right in Military Court

Scholars and journalists have extensively documented the connections between armed far-right groups and the US Armed Forces. As historian Kathleen Belew has shown, the roots of the modern militia movement lie in the networks of neo-Nazi and white power groups established in the 1970s by Vietnam veterans. And today, far-right groups like the Oath Keepers continue to recruit heavily among soldiers and veterans.
It was predictable, then, that among the pro-Trump rioters at the US Capitol last week were a number of current and former military service members.

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We Can’t Fight the Far Right in Military Court

Scholars and journalists have extensively documented the connections between armed far-right groups and the US Armed Forces. As historian Kathleen Belew has shown, the roots of the modern militia movement lie in the networks of neo-Nazi and white power groups established in the 1970s by Vietnam veterans. And today, far-right groups like the Oath Keepers continue to recruit heavily among soldiers and veterans.
It was predictable, then, that among the pro-Trump rioters at the US Capitol last week were a number of current and former military service members.

Read original

We Can’t Fight the Far Right in Military Court

Scholars and journalists have extensively documented the connections between armed far-right groups and the US Armed Forces. As historian Kathleen Belew has shown, the roots of the modern militia movement lie in the networks of neo-Nazi and white power groups established in the 1970s by Vietnam veterans. And today, far-right groups like the Oath Keepers continue to recruit heavily among soldiers and veterans.
It was predictable, then, that among the pro-Trump rioters at the US Capitol last week were a number of current and former military service members.

Read original

We Can’t Fight the Far Right in Military Court

Scholars and journalists have extensively documented the connections between armed far-right groups and the US Armed Forces. As historian Kathleen Belew has shown, the roots of the modern militia movement lie in the networks of neo-Nazi and white power groups established in the 1970s by Vietnam veterans. And today, far-right groups like the Oath Keepers continue to recruit heavily among soldiers and veterans.
It was predictable, then, that among the pro-Trump rioters at the US Capitol last week were a number of current and former military service members.

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Military in the Capitol Insurrection Should Face Courts-Martial

Representative-elect Jason Crow of Colorado speaks during a Democratic watch party in downtown Denver in 2018. (AAron Ontiveroz / The Denver Post via Getty Images)

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Colombians Take On Their Militarized Police

A police officer runs after being set ablaze during a demonstration against police violence in Medellin, Colombia on September 11, 2020. (Santiago Botero / NurPhoto via Getty Images)

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