Invisible General: How Colin Powell Conned America

There were many worse American generals in the last century than Colin Powell, men who also died, like Powell, largely celebrated for their accomplishments. Curtis LeMay (firebombed Tokyo; nearly incited a third world war on multiple occasions), Douglas MacArthur (provoked the Korean War; attempted to start nuclear war), and perhaps Tommy Franks (oversaw the invasion of Iraq), to name a few.
But Powell was uniquely bad, fundamentally a bureaucrat and public relations man for the American political and military establishment.

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Why North Korea Is Test-Launching Missiles From a Submarine and a Train

In the last month, North Korea has test-launched seven different kinds of missiles. One of them carried a hypersonic glider, one was launched from a train, one was fired from a submarine, and another was a missile with the range to hit any spot in the United States. What is going on?
First, a few caveats. The North Koreans haven’t produced these missiles in large number (or, in most cases, any number). They haven’t loaded any of them with nuclear weapons and haven’t demonstrated an ability to make a nuclear warhead small enough to fit in a missile’s nosecone.

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Why North Korea Is Test-Launching Missiles From a Submarine and a Train

In the last month, North Korea has test-launched seven different kinds of missiles. One of them carried a hypersonic glider, one was launched from a train, one was fired from a submarine, and another was a missile with the range to hit any spot in the United States. What is going on?
First, a few caveats. The North Koreans haven’t produced these missiles in large number (or, in most cases, any number). They haven’t loaded any of them with nuclear weapons and haven’t demonstrated an ability to make a nuclear warhead small enough to fit in a missile’s nosecone.

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The media missed how a new military alliance threatens to take the world to the brink

Before it’s too late, we need to ask ourselves a crucial question: Do we really — I mean truly — want a new Cold War with China?
Because that’s just where the Biden administration is clearly taking us. If you need proof, check out last month’s announcement of an “AUKUS” (Australia, United Kingdom, U.S.) military alliance in Asia. Believe me, it’s far scarier (and more racist) than the nuclear-powered submarine deal and the French diplomatic kerfuffle that dominated the media coverage of it.

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The media missed how a new military alliance threatens to take the world to the brink

Before it’s too late, we need to ask ourselves a crucial question: Do we really — I mean truly — want a new Cold War with China?
Because that’s just where the Biden administration is clearly taking us. If you need proof, check out last month’s announcement of an “AUKUS” (Australia, United Kingdom, U.S.) military alliance in Asia. Believe me, it’s far scarier (and more racist) than the nuclear-powered submarine deal and the French diplomatic kerfuffle that dominated the media coverage of it.

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Is there an ‘intelligence gap’ with China?

China has tested a nuclear-capable hypersonic vehicle, leading some to worry that the United States is falling behind its preeminent global adversary.
Their concerns are misplaced.
Washington shouldn’t be worried about a missile gap with Beijing. Rather, it should be concerned about an intelligence gap between the two superpowers.
On Oct. 16., the Financial Times reported that China had tested a nuclear-capable hypersonic vehicle in August, “demonstrating an advanced space capability that caught U.S. intelligence by surprise.” Jerry Hendrix, a retired U.S.

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What Should Really Alarm Us About China’s New “Hypersonic” Missile Test

A new type of Chinese missile is triggering panic among some U.S. defense officials, but the alarms are overblown.
In a test this past August, according to an article in last weekend’s Financial Times, this missile flew at “hypersonic” speeds in a low orbit all the way around the globe. Toward the end of the flight, it released a vehicle (capable of containing a nuclear warhead), which then glided toward its target. Such a missile could approach the United States not just from the north—as normal ballistic missiles would—but from the east, west, or south.

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The New Metroid Makes the Case for a Controversial Video-Game Practice

Do you love nothing more than to backtrack through a part of a video game you’ve already been through? I surely do—I love to confidently revisit an area I struggled through once I’ve powered up and am now able to take it on with ease. Backtracking can be divisive (my very own editor can’t stand it), but if you, too, find it satisfying, you need to get yourself Metroid Dread—the first original Metroid story in nearly two decades, now on Nintendo Switch.

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To Avoid Armageddon, Don’t Modernize Missiles—Eliminate Them

A Titan nuclear intercontinental ballistic missile in a silo. (Michael Dunning / Getty Images)

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To Avoid Armageddon, Don’t Modernize Missiles—Eliminate Them

A Titan nuclear intercontinental ballistic missile in a silo. (Michael Dunning / Getty Images)

Subscribe to The Nation
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Thank you for signing up for The Nation’s weekly newsletter.

Thank you for signing up. For more from The Nation, check out our latest issue.

Subscribe to The Nation
Subscribe now for as little as $2 a month!

Support Progressive Journalism
The Nation is reader supported: Chip in $10 or more to help us continue to write about the issues that matter.

Sign up for our Wine Club today.

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