Is Iran Trying to Create a New ‘Hezbollah-Style Lebanon’ in the Caucasus?

At its height 2,500 years ago, the Persian Empire was one of the world’s most advanced civilizations. Now, occupying the same homeland, the Iranian regime is one of the most backward governments on the planet. The religious extremists controlling Tehran try to connect themselves to their subjects’ ancestors, while doing everything possible to destroy any chance of a new age of enlightenment and prosperity. 
Not satisfied with just destroying the country they control, the fundamentalists have expanded their reign of terror throughout Iraq, Syria, and Lebanon.

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The Slow Death of Artistic Freedom in India

This article is part of the Free Speech Project, a collaboration between Future Tense and the Tech, Law, & Security Program at American University Washington College of Law that examines the ways technology is influencing how we think about speech.

Fan fiction isn’t big in India, so it was surprising to see the collective imagination of the country go into overdrive in November 2015.

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The Slow Death of Artistic Freedom in India

This article is part of the Free Speech Project, a collaboration between Future Tense and the Tech, Law, & Security Program at American University Washington College of Law that examines the ways technology is influencing how we think about speech.

Fan fiction isn’t big in India, so it was surprising to see the collective imagination of the country go into overdrive in November 2015.

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“Men’s Rights Asians” Think This Is Their Moment

In May 2020, a Yale undergraduate named Eileen Huang wrote an open letter following the murder of George Floyd by Minneapolis police. Writing on a blog called Chinese American, Huang warned of “the rampant anti-Blackness in the Asian American community that, if unchecked, can bring violence to us all.” Her appeal quickly went viral among Asian Americans on Twitter and on the Chinese platform WeChat, and sparked a conversation in the media about ways that Asian Americans have helped perpetuate racism. For lots of readers, the discussion was eye-opening.

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Scammers Are Using Deepfake Videos Now

Highly realistic deepfake videos didn’t quite make the splash some feared they would during the 2020 presidential election. (Less sophisticated “cheapfake” videos certainly did make the rounds, though.)
Nevertheless, deepfakes are causing trouble—for regular people.
In March, the Federal Bureau of Investigation warned that it expected fraudsters to leverage “synthetic content for cyber … operations in the next 12-18 months.”
In deepfake videos, which first appeared in 2017, a computer-generated face (often of a real person) is superimposed on someone else.

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Rain fell on Greenland’s ice sheet for the first time ever known. Alarms should ring | Kim Heacox

OpinionEnvironment

Rain fell on Greenland’s ice sheet for the first time ever known. Alarms should ring

Kim Heacox

Climate scientists believe that if Greenland continues to rapidly melt, tens of millions of people around the world could face yearly flooding and displacement by 2030

‘If the people of Miami, Shanghai, Tokyo, Mumbai, Lagos, Bangkok and New York are not concerned, they should be.’ Photograph: Mario Tama/Getty Images

‘If the people of Miami, Shanghai, Tokyo, Mumbai, Lagos, Bangkok and New York are not concerned, they should be.

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Rain fell on Greenland’s ice sheet for the first time ever known. Alarms should ring | Kim Heacox

OpinionEnvironment

Rain fell on Greenland’s ice sheet for the first time ever known. Alarms should ring

Kim Heacox

Climate scientists believe that if Greenland continues to rapidly melt, tens of millions of people around the world could face yearly flooding and displacement by 2030

‘If the people of Miami, Shanghai, Tokyo, Mumbai, Lagos, Bangkok and New York are not concerned, they should be.’ Photograph: Mario Tama/Getty Images

‘If the people of Miami, Shanghai, Tokyo, Mumbai, Lagos, Bangkok and New York are not concerned, they should be.

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Twenty Years Ago, the World Changed

The towers of the World Trade Center pour smoke after being struck by hijacked commercial aircraft, September 11, 2001. (Brad Rickerby/Reuters)
Twenty years ago, on a brilliantly clear early-fall morning, four airliners hijacked by terrorists crashed into the Pentagon, the World Trade Center Towers, and a Pennsylvania field. Almost 3,000 innocent Americans were killed; the damage, heaviest in New York City, ran into the billions of dollars.
It was the dawn of a new and awful world. The attack happened to come on the second-to-last day of NR’s production schedule.

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Why Don’t More Countries Enforce the Airport Security Rules That the TSA Says Are Essential?

“Mommy, do we need to take our shoes off again?” the little American girl asked as she stood in a security line at a German airport with her four younger siblings. Her mother said yes, prompting a more experienced American traveler to correct her: “Actually, here you do not.”
According to the bystander, who described the incident on FlyerTalk, a forum for frequent travelers, “Mommy ignored me. The little girl turned around, and I pointed out several people going through the [metal detector] without removing their shoes.

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Op-Ed: Leaving Afghanistan: No right way to do the wrong thing  

The haunting image of a desperate Afghan man falling to his death from the fuselage of a departing U.S. C-17 military cargo plane will be forever burned in America’s collective consciousness and symbolic of our ignominious defeat after two decades in Afghanistan.
The U.S. has effectively been waging two wars concurrently in Afghanistan over the last two decades. One was by necessity: safeguarding America from transnational terrorist attacks. The other was a war of choice: bringing greater freedoms and opportunities to Afghanistan and her people.

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