New intelligence report warns of ‘destabilizing effects’ from climate change and its national security risks

08/23/2020,California:Hundreds of wildfires burn across California leading thousands to evacuate, photo via Shutterstock.

A seminal assessment released by the Office of the Director of National Intelligence details the destabilizing risks of climate change and how it could heighten national security risks in the coming years.
The assessment, released on Thursday, October 21, warned of exacerbated national security risks for the United States and other countries due to increases in intensifying physical impact and the looming possibility of instability.

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A reluctant warrior? An examination of Gen. Colin Powell’s bloody legacy from Iraq to Latin America

We look at the life and legacy of Colin Powell, who is best known for giving false testimony to the U.N. Security Council in 2003 about nonexistent weapons of mass destruction in Iraq, paving the way for the U.S. invasion and occupation that would kill over 1 million Iraqis. Powell, who was the first Black secretary of state, the first Black and youngest chair of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and the first Black national security adviser, died on Monday due to blood cancer and Parkinson’s disease that left him vulnerable to infection from COVID-19. Tributes poured in from top U.S.

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China’s Challenge to the Monroe Doctrine

Time magazine reported earlier this year that China is South America’s top trading partner. Chinese companies, according to correspondents Ciara Nugent and Charlie Campbell, invested nearly $13 billion in Latin America in 2019, while China is a major consumer of Latin American exports, purchasing “beef from Uruguay, copper from Chile, oil from Colombia, and soya from Brazil.” State-controlled Chinese tech companies (Huawei, ZTE, Dahua, Hikvision) have made inroads in Latin America, Time reports, that will allow “Beijing to dictate the rules of commerce for a generation.

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There’s Nothing Honorable or Decent About Colin Powell’s Long List of War Crimes

Colin Powell, soldier, statesman, and lifelong public servant to the imperatives of empire, died yesterday, at the age of 84. He is survived by his wife, three children, and four grandchildren. He was predeceased by his eponymous doctrine and at least 185,000 Iraqi civilians.
Born in 1937, Powell preceded by a decade the institution that would define both his life and much of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.

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There’s Nothing Honorable or Decent About Colin Powell’s Long List of War Crimes

Colin Powell, soldier, statesman, and lifelong public servant to the imperatives of empire, died yesterday, at the age of 84. He is survived by his wife, three children, and four grandchildren. He was predeceased by his eponymous doctrine and at least 185,000 Iraqi civilians.
Born in 1937, Powell preceded by a decade the institution that would define both his life and much of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.

Read original

There’s Nothing Honorable or Decent About Colin Powell’s Long List of War Crimes

Colin Powell, soldier, statesman, and lifelong public servant to the imperatives of empire, died yesterday, at the age of 84. He is survived by his wife, three children, and four grandchildren. He was predeceased by his eponymous doctrine and at least 185,000 Iraqi civilians.
Born in 1937, Powell preceded by a decade the institution that would define both his life and much of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.

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‘Be Human’

Berta Valle, wife of the Nicaraguan political prisoner Félix Maradiaga, speaking at the Oslo Freedom Forum in Miami, October 2021 (Courtesy of the Oslo Freedom Forum)
Notes on a gathering of democracy leaders and human-rights activists
Someone says to me, “Jay, this is Andrei.” I say, “Hi, Andrei.” Then I look at his name tag, which includes his last name. My eyes widen. My heart skips a beat or two. He is Andrei Sannikov, the Belarusian statesman and former political prisoner. He was a presidential candidate in 2010. For his troubles, he was imprisoned and tortured almost to death.

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‘Be Human’

Berta Valle, wife of the Nicaraguan political prisoner Félix Maradiaga, speaking at the Oslo Freedom Forum in Miami, October 2021 (Courtesy of the Oslo Freedom Forum)
Notes on a gathering of democracy leaders and human-rights activists
Someone says to me, “Jay, this is Andrei.” I say, “Hi, Andrei.” Then I look at his name tag, which includes his last name. My eyes widen. My heart skips a beat or two. He is Andrei Sannikov, the Belarusian statesman and former political prisoner. He was a presidential candidate in 2010. For his troubles, he was imprisoned and tortured almost to death.

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Rev. Samuel Rodriguez: What National Hispanic Heritage Month means to me in one word

NEWYou can now listen to Fox News articles!
National Hispanic Heritage Month is not only a time to look back at the achievements and contributions of Hispanic and Latino Americans, but it is also a celebration of hope for what is to come. We are pressing forward toward a bright future in which we will be the ones to inspire and achieve greatness in every sector of the United States of America. 
Long before Jamestown or Plymouth Rock, we made our home here.

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Canadian Private Security Companies Have Wreaked Havoc in Afghanistan

Last month, the CBC’s Judy Trinh filed a story about ex–special forces David Lavery’s efforts to get dozens of people out of Kabul before the Taliban takeover. A founding member of Joint Task Force 2, an elite branch of Canada’s armed forces primarily tasked with counterterrorism, Lavery coordinated with veterans to help over a hundred individuals with Canadian papers flee the South Central Asian nation.
The story reads like a made-for-TV action movie. Beneath the confected heroics lies a far more troubling narrative about the Wild West of private-security profiteering.

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