Ten Years After Occupy, We Have a Left That Matters

Review of Remake the World: Essays, Reflections, Rebellions by Astra Taylor (Haymarket Books, 2021).

Ten years after Occupy Wall Street took over a small park in downtown Manhattan, the new left that was birthed there continues to develop and grow. The occupation of Zuccotti Park — and the numerous other occupations that it inspired — was short-lived, but it transformed the political landscape in the United States and beyond.

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Ten Years After Occupy, We Have a Left That Matters

Review of Remake the World: Essays, Reflections, Rebellions by Astra Taylor (Haymarket Books, 2021).

Ten years after Occupy Wall Street took over a small park in downtown Manhattan, the new left that was birthed there continues to develop and grow. The occupation of Zuccotti Park — and the numerous other occupations that it inspired — was short-lived, but it transformed the political landscape in the United States and beyond.

Read original

Was Occupy Wall Street More Anarchist or Socialist?

Occupy Wall Street protesters attempt to disrupt the pedestrian flow for financial workers in New York City on September 19, 2011. (Emmanuel Dunand / AFP via Getty Images)

It feels most apt to mark the 10th anniversary of Occupy Wall Street by reviving a debate that is resistant to resolution, open to endless disagreement, and primed for messy expressions of political ideology. How very Occupy!1

If you had asked me at the time whether Occupy was more anarchist or socialist, I would have answered, without missing a beat, that it was an anarchist movement.

Read original

Was Occupy Wall Street More Anarchist or Socialist?

Occupy Wall Street protesters attempt to disrupt the pedestrian flow for financial workers in New York City on September 19, 2011. (Emmanuel Dunand / AFP via Getty Images)

It feels most apt to mark the 10th anniversary of Occupy Wall Street by reviving a debate that is resistant to resolution, open to endless disagreement, and primed for messy expressions of political ideology. How very Occupy!1

If you had asked me at the time whether Occupy was more anarchist or socialist, I would have answered, without missing a beat, that it was an anarchist movement.

Read original

Was Occupy Wall Street More Anarchist or Socialist?

Occupy Wall Street protesters attempt to disrupt the pedestrian flow for financial workers in New York City on September 19, 2011. (Emmanuel Dunand / AFP via Getty Images)

It feels most apt to mark the 10th anniversary of Occupy Wall Street by reviving a debate that is resistant to resolution, open to endless disagreement, and primed for messy expressions of political ideology. How very Occupy!1

If you had asked me at the time whether Occupy was more anarchist or socialist, I would have answered, without missing a beat, that it was an anarchist movement.

Read original

David Graeber and David Wengrow’s Anarchist History of Humanity

Illustration by Tim Robinson.

Protest speaks a language of forceful insistence. “Defund the police,” “Build the wall”—the unyielding demands go back to Moses’ “Let my people go.” So it was curious when the July 2011 issue of the Vancouver-based magazine Adbusters ran a cryptic call to arms: a ballerina posing atop the famous Charging Bull statue on Wall Street, with the question “What is our one demand?” printed above her in red. The question wasn’t answered; readers were only told, “#OccupyWallStreet. September 17th. Bring tent.

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Sexism and Racism on the Left: What Has and Hasn’t Changed Since Occupy Wall Street

In the streets: The movement’s participants included more women and people of color than many media outlets suggested. (Emmanuel Dunand / AFP via Getty Images)

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Fighting Inequality After Occupy Wall Street

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Occupy Wall Street was criticized at the time for railing against systemic problems without offering a concrete list of solutions. Yet protesters did speak out about policies they saw as unjust and about others that would address the ills they stood against. The movement has left an indelible mark not just on the national conversation about inequality but on the laws and structures that enable it. The rampant inequality Occupy decried has been perpetuated through decades of policy choices—and can be undone by the same.

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Sexism and Racism on the Left: What Has and Hasn’t Changed Since Occupy Wall Street

In the streets: The movement’s participants included more women and people of color than many media outlets suggested. (Emmanuel Dunand / AFP via Getty Images)

Subscribe to The Nation
Subscribe now for as little as $2 a month!

Thank you for signing up for The Nation’s weekly newsletter.

Thank you for signing up. For more from The Nation, check out our latest issue.

Read original

Fighting Inequality After Occupy Wall Street

N

Occupy Wall Street was criticized at the time for railing against systemic problems without offering a concrete list of solutions. Yet protesters did speak out about policies they saw as unjust and about others that would address the ills they stood against. The movement has left an indelible mark not just on the national conversation about inequality but on the laws and structures that enable it. The rampant inequality Occupy decried has been perpetuated through decades of policy choices—and can be undone by the same.

Read original