Plastics Destined to Create More Emissions Than Coal in the US, Study Finds

Christopher Pike/Bloomberg/Getty

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This story was originally published by HuffPost and is reproduced here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration.
Plastics are everywhere. From the stomachs of deep-sea fish to human feces, Arctic snow to gusts of wind in the remote wilderness, the oil and gas byproduct has, barely a century after it was first synthesized in a laboratory, become a ubiquitous feature of virtually every ecosystem on Earth and every aspect of modern life.

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Plastics Destined to Create More Emissions Than Coal in the US, Study Finds

Christopher Pike/Bloomberg/Getty

Fight disinformation. Get a daily recap of the facts that matter. Sign up for the free Mother Jones newsletter.
This story was originally published by HuffPost and is reproduced here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration.
Plastics are everywhere. From the stomachs of deep-sea fish to human feces, Arctic snow to gusts of wind in the remote wilderness, the oil and gas byproduct has, barely a century after it was first synthesized in a laboratory, become a ubiquitous feature of virtually every ecosystem on Earth and every aspect of modern life.

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Poaching is altering the genetics of wild animals

Sometime in the distant past, well before humans walked the Earth, the ancestors of modern-day elephants evolved their iconic tusks. Elephants use their bleach-white incisors — they’re technically giant teeth, like ours but longer — to dig, collect food, and protect themselves.
Then Homo sapiens arrived, and elephant tusks became a liability. Poachers kill the massive animals for their tusks, which are worth about $330 a pound wholesale as of 2017. Hunters slaughter roughly 20,000 elephants a year to supply the global ivory trade, according to the World Wildlife Fund.

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Biden’s Incredible Shrinking Climate Plan

The centerpiece of the White House’s climate agenda, the Clean Energy Payment Program, or CEPP, seemingly expired unceremoniously late last week due to West Virginia Senator Joe Manchin’s opposition. Progressives—who’ve watched the reconciliation package be winnowed down from $6 trillion to just $1.9 trillion—are now scrambling to figure out how to bring some kind of comparable emissions-reducing plan back from the dead before world leaders start debating the future of the Paris Agreement in Glasgow on Halloween.

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Joe Manchin Might Be a Sentient Brick of Coal, but There’s Still a Chance Democrats Will Pass a Decent Climate Plan

If a brick of coal could talk, it would probably sound a lot like Joe Manchin, who lately has been telling his fellow Democrats that it’s time to give up on their boldest ideas to fight climate change.
First, the senator from West Virginia shot down the Clean Electricity Performance Program, or CEPP, an ambitious proposal designed to make power companies cut their emissions that was originally meant to be a centerpiece of the party’s global warming agenda.

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The Great American Ammunition Conspiracy

Ammunition comes to the local sporting goods store in Waco, Texas, every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday. If you find yourself driving by at quarter to nine on one of those days, you will see a line of people snaking along the side of the building, waiting for the opening and their chance to buy rounds. Any other day of the week, the shelves are empty.
It has been this way for months. Gun magazines and websites discuss the “Great Ammo Shortage,” which started during the pandemic, but which is projected to last into 2022.

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The Great American Ammunition Conspiracy

Ammunition comes to the local sporting goods store in Waco, Texas, every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday. If you find yourself driving by at quarter to nine on one of those days, you will see a line of people snaking along the side of the building, waiting for the opening and their chance to buy rounds. Any other day of the week, the shelves are empty.
It has been this way for months. Gun magazines and websites discuss the “Great Ammo Shortage,” which started during the pandemic, but which is projected to last into 2022.

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Climate Change Calls for Adaptation, Not Panic

By
Bjorn Lomborg

Updated Oct. 21, 2021 4:55 am ET

Editor’s note: As November’s global climate conference in Glasgow draws near, important facts about climate change don’t always make it into the dominant media coverage. We’re here to help. Each Thursday contributor
Bjorn Lomborg
will provide some important background so readers can have a better understanding of the true effects of climate change and the real costs of climate policy.

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The pernicious lies of neoliberalism still haunt us — threatening the future of life on Earth

In country after country around the world, people are rising up to challenge entrenched, failing neoliberal political and economic systems, with mixed but sometimes promising results.
Progressive leaders in the U.S. Congress are refusing to back down on the Democrats’ promises to American voters to reduce poverty, expand rights to healthcare, education and clean energy, and repair a shredded social safety net. After decades of tax cuts for the rich, they are also committed to raising taxes on wealthy Americans and corporations to pay for this popular agenda.

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