Hunter Biden raises more questions of profiting off politics and climate change corruption

Hunter Biden’s ties to China, along with the administration’s conflicts of interest in its climate change agenda, are in the news once again.
Earlier this week, the New York Times reported that an investment firm Biden helped establish had helped a Chinese company purchase one of the world’s richest cobalt mines located in the Congo from a U.S. company. The Washington Free Beacon previously reported on this in January 2020, after months of the Congolese military torching houses and silencing dissent in the region to prevent illegal mining.

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Starbucks: Purveyor of Fresh Coffee and Stale Union-Busting

One of the most interesting union campaigns in recent years is happening right now in Buffalo, New York. Workers in three Starbucks outlets started a union organizing effort over their concerns about seniority pay, scheduling, staffing levels, and safety and health during COVID (plus, at one store an infestation of bees was left festering for months). Earlier this month, the National Labor Relations Board mailed ballots to the workers in these stores, who will have four weeks to vote on whether to unionize with Workers United, an affiliate of the Service Employees International Union.

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The Rise of the Imperial Regulator

Outside the Federal Reserve building in Washington, D.C. (Larry Downing/Reuters)
The week of November 15: regulatory creep, inflation, taxation, and much, much more.
I was going to write this week about the president’s, uh, ambitious claim that some sort of conspiracy was behind the increase in the oil price, but numerous NR types got there first.

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The Rise of the Imperial Regulator

Outside the Federal Reserve building in Washington, D.C. (Larry Downing/Reuters)
The week of November 15: regulatory creep, inflation, taxation, and much, much more.
I was going to write this week about the president’s, uh, ambitious claim that some sort of conspiracy was behind the increase in the oil price, but numerous NR types got there first.

Read original

The Rise of the Imperial Regulator

Outside the Federal Reserve building in Washington, D.C. (Larry Downing/Reuters)
The week of November 15: regulatory creep, inflation, taxation, and much, much more.
I was going to write this week about the president’s, uh, ambitious claim that some sort of conspiracy was behind the increase in the oil price, but numerous NR types got there first.

Read original

How Stablecoins Can Help the Underbanked

Opinion

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Posted: Nov 21, 2021 12:01 AM

The opinions expressed by columnists are their own and do not necessarily represent the views of Townhall.com.

The Biden administration has made it clear they oppose the potential of stablecoins. But proponents view these private digital tokens, which are backed by reserve assets such as the U.S. dollar and short-term debt (e.g., commercial paper), as serving a key function to ensuring that all Americans have access to financial services.

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For Once, College Football’s Playoff Committee Might Do This Right

We are in the eighth year of the four-team College Football Playoff. The selection committee that picks the teams hasn’t been consistent about everything over those years, but it’s been dogged about one thing: an eternal belief that teams from outside the Power Five conferences—the conferences that form the top half of the sport’s top division—are not worthy of serious consideration. That isn’t a new feature in college football, but a constant that’s transcended various postseason formats over decades.

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For Once, College Football’s Playoff Committee Might Do This Right

We are in the eighth year of the four-team College Football Playoff. The selection committee that picks the teams hasn’t been consistent about everything over those years, but it’s been dogged about one thing: an eternal belief that teams from outside the Power Five conferences—the conferences that form the top half of the sport’s top division—are not worthy of serious consideration. That isn’t a new feature in college football, but a constant that’s transcended various postseason formats over decades.

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Apple will finally let you fix your own devices — sort of

Apple announced on Wednesday that it will start letting people repair their own products. The announcement marks a change in Apple’s repair policies and a big step forward for the right-to-repair movement. At the same time, the new program shows how Apple still wants these self-service repairs to happen on its own terms.
The iPhone maker’s new approach is relatively simple.

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The Astroworld Tragedy is a Story of Corporate Power

On Sunday night, the 10th victim of the stampede at the Astroworld Festival in Houston was announced. Ezra Blount was a nine-year-old Travis Scott fan pushed off his father’s shoulders and trampled by onrushing concert-goers. He’d spent several days on life support.
“This should not have been the outcome of taking their son to a concert, what should have been a joyful celebration,” family attorney Ben Crump said in a statement, and he’s right. But it is an outcome far more frequent than anyone might expect.

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