Jack Dorsey Tried to Be Cool, But the Company He Built Is Deeply Conventional

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Jack Dorsey always looked like a person who was trying to affect something else. He was the CEO of two big Silicon Valley tech companies—Square and Twitter—and is, as of today, just the CEO of one after leaving the latter. But he tried to present himself as something else. A “cool CEO,” maybe.

Instead of button-down business casual, Dorsey wore drapey, oversized, Yeezy-brand-esque black T-shirts.

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Chinese Province to Install Cutting-Edge Surveillance System to Spy on Journalists, Other ‘Suspicious People’

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Officials in China’s Henan province, one of the country’s largest provinces, plan to install a surveillance system to spy on journalists, international students, and other individuals who could pose a security risk to the Chinese regime.
Per the system’s blueprint, 3,000 facial recognition cameras connected to national and regional databases will be installed to scan for the identities of “suspicious people” who the government would like to monitor, according to documents Reuters reviewed on the Henan province procurement website.

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Disney+ Pulls The Simpsons Tiananmen Square Episode in Hong Kong

Characters in the film and television series The Simpsons (front to back) Lisa, Bart, Maggie, Marge, and Homer Simpson walk the carpet as they arrive for the premiere of the film The Simpsons Movie in Springfield, Vt., July 21, 2007. (Lucas Jackson/Reuters)
Disney has censored The Simpsons on its streaming service in Hong Kong, omitting an episode that mentions the 1989 Tiananmen Square massacre.
Episodes 11 and 13 of season 16 are available to view in Hong Kong, but not episode 12, “Goo Goo Gai Pain.

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The Dark Movie Exposing Jeffrey Epstein’s House of Horrors

Jeffrey Epstein was a monster, and his cursed spirit lives on in The Scary of Sixty-First, a wild indie throwback (Dec. 3 in LA; Dec. 17 in New York; Dec. 24 on VOD) that skillfully straddles the line between serious giallo homage and outlandish topical joke. Directed and co-written by Dasha Nekrasova (of Succession fame), it employs the late pedophilic financier’s crimes as a launching pad for sapphic Italian-style horror, delivering a strange blend of sincerity and silliness that marks Nekrasova as a talented filmmaker to watch.

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Here’s What ‘Succession’ Gets So Right About Toxic Whiteness

“I don’t do requests because I’m not a DJ” should really become the motto of every Black woman who, hired for her expertise and competency, nonetheless has to deal with colleagues and clients who attempt to undermine both.
On the last episode of Succession, the line is delivered by Lisa Arthur—the Gloria Allred-esque Black woman celebrity lawyer—in response to Kendall Roy, who has retained her services, only to consistently ignore every bit of legal advice he is paying her to give him.

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How Stephen Sondheim Solved the Puzzle of Being Alive

Stephen Sondheim loved puzzles. As a child, seeking solace in the aftermath of his parents’ bitter divorce, puzzles provided him with a much-needed escape. As he described it to his biographer Meryle Secrest, when his parents split, “nothing made sense anymore.” Human beings and their relations were on some level inscrutable, and relying upon them was like building your house on sand. But puzzles had a clear solution: They were dependable; they created some terra firma on which your feet could rest.

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Later in life, Sondheim would collect puzzles and games.

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How Puerto Rico became the most vaccinated place in America

Florida shares deep connections with Puerto Rico as home to the territory’s largest diaspora community on the US mainland. But when it comes to Covid-19, the two places have little in common.
While Florida, like many states in the South, has seen high infection rates and troubling death counts, Puerto Rico has been something of a coronavirus success story.

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How the Berenstain Bears Thanksgiving Book Became the Bane of My Existence

Last year, around this time, my husband and preschool-aged child came home from our local bookstore with a new-to-us Berenstain Bears book: Thanksgiving Blessings (2013). My husband said, with a glint in his eye, “Why don’t you read the new book with J.?” I tried but had to stop so many times to say, “I hate this,” and “Oh my GOD!” that my daughter got annoyed and wandered away. “It’s a Mike?” I asked my husband. “It’s a Mike,” he confirmed.

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I write to you today, fellow parents, to explain what that means—and to issue a warning.

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Even Gavin Newsom is telling mayors to get tougher on crime

The issue of crime in Democrat-run cities has reached a boiling point. Now, even California Gov. Gavin Newsom is telling Democratic mayors to get it together.
“I’m not the mayor of California, but I was a mayor [of San Francisco 2004-11], and I know when things like this happen, mayors have to step up,” Newsom said Monday. “We need to investigate these crimes. We need to break up these crime rings. We need to make an example out of these folks.”
Newsom’s remarks come after stores in San Francisco’s Union Square were looted.

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Why you should care about Facebook’s big push into the metaverse

It’s the next big breakthrough in technology. It’s a joke. It’s a marketing strategy. It’s a techno-dystopian nightmare. It’s the metaverse — defined most simply as a virtual world where people can socialize, work, and play — and Facebook’s CEO Mark Zuckerberg believes it is the future of the internet and of his trillion-dollar company.

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