Why Isn’t Terry McAuliffe Cruising in Virginia?

Usually, the Virginia governor’s race is seen as a herald for what will happen in a midterm election a year later. This year there’s more to it than that.
It’s one of three gubernatorial elections this year—if you count the upcoming recall vote for Gov. Gavin Newsom in California—where a Democrat whose tenure as governor gets a close review. But it’s the only race of those three where the legislative progress of the state and, most likely, control of the state legislature is effectively at stake.

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How the Critical Race Theory Scare-Mongering Failed in Virginia

Until last year, my pinko politics mostly found expression online. I did not expect that to change when I moved to the country, after retiring from the federal government. But lo and behold, an obligation to vault beyond cyber-engagement arose when a bitter racial struggle erupted in my new home in Loudoun County, Virginia, a good hour drive from downtown Washington, D.C. The ostensible object of controversy is Critical Race Theory, or CRT, but arguably, something else is going on.
A little background on the setting. Loudoun is one of the richest counties in the United States.

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How the Hangover from Trump’s Presidency Is Shaping Democratic Primaries

Democratic candidates for Governor of Virginia debate at Virginia State University on April 6, 2021.Steve Helber/AP

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On most Tuesdays for the last five years, a gaggle of protesters have regularly gathered on a grassy hillside along a main drag in Sterling, Virginia, a far-flung suburb northwest of Washington, DC. In the early days of the Trump administration, as many as 40 people would congregate, brandishing signs that criticized former Rep.

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How the Hangover from Trump’s Presidency Is Shaping Democratic Primaries

Democratic candidates for Governor of Virginia debate at Virginia State University on April 6, 2021.Steve Helber/AP

Let our journalists help you make sense of the noise: Subscribe to the Mother Jones Daily newsletter and get a recap of news that matters.
On most Tuesdays for the last five years, a gaggle of protesters have regularly gathered on a grassy hillside along a main drag in Sterling, Virginia, a far-flung suburb northwest of Washington, DC. In the early days of the Trump administration, as many as 40 people would congregate, brandishing signs that criticized former Rep.

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Virtual Town Halls Change How Politicians Sell The Stimulus

The summer of 2009 was not a good one for Democrats.
They had just passed the Affordable Care Act, the party’s most ambitious bill in a generation, and while congressional Democrats were ecstatic, the voters were indignant.
When Democrats returned to their districts in August to hold town halls, lawmakers were greeted with white-hot rage and widespread opposition to a health-care bill that Republicans had already branded as toxic.

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How Progressives Are Building Power in the Biden White House

In order to understand just how open the lines of communication are between the progressive left and President Joe Biden, look no further than White House chief of staff Ron Klain’s call log.
Klain speaks to Sens. Bernie Sanders (I-VT) and Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) “quite often,” recently talked to freshman Rep. Jamaal Bowman (D-NY), a newly minted Squad member, and has conversations with many “less famous” individuals in the Democratic Party’s left wing on a regular basis, he told The Daily Beast in an interview. Almost always, those chats are conducted over the phone.

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Resistance Disconnect

As the clock struck noon on January 20, 2021, liberals across America let out sighs of relief. But relaxation has been transitory, as it dawns on activists that Trump’s departure is just one moment in an ongoing, dire struggle to save U.S. democracy and make government work for the majority—as the Republican Party ever more tightly embraces violent authoritarian tendencies.
How to proceed? Many left advocates see this as a moment to rev up progressive demands on newly installed Democratic officials.

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Resistance Disconnect

As the clock struck noon on January 20, 2021, liberals across America let out sighs of relief. But relaxation has been transitory, as it dawns on activists that Trump’s departure is just one moment in an ongoing, dire struggle to save U.S. democracy and make government work for the majority—as the Republican Party ever more tightly embraces violent authoritarian tendencies.
How to proceed? Many left advocates see this as a moment to rev up progressive demands on newly installed Democratic officials.

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In Tennessee Senate Race, GOP Candidates Vie for the Mantle of Trumpism

Former American ambassador to Japan, Bill Hagerty, speaks with Secretary of State Mike Pompeo as he arrives in Osaka, Japan for the G-20 summit, June 27, 2019. (Jacquelyn Martin/Reuters)A state that has long favored relatively moderate, business-friendly Republicans is poised to go in a more populist direction this November.
If a Trumpian populist created his perfect Senate candidate in a lab, the result might look something like Dr. Manny Sethi.

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One Wedding and a Political Funeral

Virginia Republicans have spent the past decade getting routed in elections. They lost three U.S. congressional seats and control of both chambers of the state legislature in 2018 alone. Yet today, with another tough election less than five months away, Republicans in Virginia’s Fifth District will gather in a church parking lot to decide whether to boot their incumbent congressman, Denver Riggleman, largely because he officiated a same-sex wedding last summer.

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