In Sickness and In Health, But Not for Lunch

For many years I would threaten my wife with the possibility of working from home. Her consistent response was, “In sickness and in health, but not for lunch!” A good line but, ultimately, no defense to the onslaught of the coronavirus and multiple lockdown orders from the Virginia governor (through June 10) and the mayor of Washington, D.C.
So we are now a cozy couple at home Zooming with children and grandchildren, participating in televised Masses, going for daily walks, remote working, and enjoying delightful lunches prepared by my resigned but loving spouse.

Read original

Andrew Cuomo and the Left’s New Champions of Life

“Let us silence the cries of death!”
So urged a passionate Pope Francis in his Easter Vigil homily to an eerily empty St. Peter’s Basilica, stirred by the lethal global COVID-19 pandemic: “No more wars! May we stop the production and trade of weapons! Let abortion and the killing of innocent lives end!”
The pope was not afraid to remind those concerned about death from the scourge of COVID-19 that they should also be concerned about death from the scourge of abortion.

Read original

Celebrating Primrose Day and Liberty

Happy Primrose Day! If such glad tidings are tolerated as the coronavirus — or the response thereto — continues its world-wide assault upon our health, our polities, and our sanity.
Primrose Day is an occasion to celebrate the life and career of Benjamin Disraeli on the anniversary of his death in 1881 and named, according to Queen Victoria, for his favorite flower.

Read original

Whitmer to Michigan: Stay Home and Shut Up

Washington
When historians look back at America’s handling of the coronavirus outbreak, they likely will cite Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer as the best example of how not to contain a pandemic in your state.
The Democratic governor has turned her state into the heart of COVID-19 resistance. On Wednesday, protesters shut down the roads in Lansing, the state’s capital, in a protest dubbed “Operation Gridlock.

Read original

Death Comes for Arabia’s Bishop

Few people know that a Roman Catholic bishop serves in Saudi Arabia. Fewer would know this man’s name or details of his life and work.
The most recent bishop of Saudi Arabia, Camillo Ballin, died on Easter Sunday in Rome, where he was receiving medical treatment for lung cancer. He was 75 years old and had been preparing to retire as soon as Pope Francis would appoint a successor.
Formally Bishop Ballin was known as the Vicar Apostolic of Northern Arabia, the Catholic prelate responsible for four neighboring countries: Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, Bahrain, and Qatar.

Read original

Hands Sanitized and Paint Stripped While You Wait

A Polish liquor carrying the unlikely name of Spirytus Rekyfikowany, unlikely at least to Anglophones, made page 1A of Saturday’s Wall Street Journal because many Americans are buying this hearty imported booze to use as hand sanitizer, regular hand sanitizers being about as hard to find these days as toilet paper. The reason this tongue-twister can serve as a hand sanitizer is that it’s 96 percent alcohol. (The story doesn’t say what the other four percent is. Maybe the fire marshal knows.)
I’d never heard of 96 percent alcohol booze before. That’s 192 proof in American.

Read original

Pandemic Science, Media Panic, and Political Response

There has been no condemnation more critical, more widespread, and more sustained than the mainstream media’s assault on President Donald Trump’s comparison of the coronavirus pandemic to the seasonal flu, citing 2018 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) fatalities data.
The CDC has now issued fatality estimates for the 2019–20 flu season as between 24,000 and 62,000 deaths, about the same as the numbers the president used earlier.

Read original

Brexit in Time of Coronavirus

Brexiteers greet the news of Boris Johnson’s slow recovery from the coronavirus with relief. For despite his missteps since becoming prime minister, few who espouse the ideas of British liberty doubt that without his determination and optimism, Britain may never have realized its independence from the European Union.
Equally, few doubt that the political measures taken by the British government to confront coronavirus place that very liberty in jeopardy.

Read original

The Upside of Downtime

Before the latest coronavirus touched down, life in America was pretty good for most of us. Paychecks were getting fatter. Wall Street was booming. Unemployment was so low economists wondered if it actually could get much lower.
You’re probably expecting a “but” here, a contrast. A polemicist might argue that our quality of life wasn’t as good as we thought. A journalist might dwell on the story of how we lost so much so quickly.
There’s nothing wrong with those takes, but I would rather focus on something unexpected many of us just gained.

Read original

How Small Businesses Are Sacrificing for America

When the future author of Democracy in America, Alexis de Tocqueville, arrived in Newport harbor, New York, at eight o’clock on the evening of May 9, 1831, it didn’t take him very long to realize that he was entering a country that was a New World in more ways than one.
Tocqueville was immediately astonished at “the spirit of enterprise” that characterized the country. Americans, Tocqueville quickly realized, were “a commercial people.” The nation buzzed with the pursuit of wealth. “Almost all of them,” Tocqueville scribbled in one of his notebooks, are “entrepreneurs.

Read original