A mysterious and powerful radio signal from space is repeating itself

Outer space is chirping, and no one quite knows why.
Known as fast radio bursts, or FRBs for short, these very brief yet incredibly powerful bursts of radio wave energy appear to be coming from all corners of the universe. And while astronomers can pick up such signals, they are, because of their brief duration, very difficult to study. Very few of them ever repeat; and since they only last a millisecond, telescopes can rarely focus on them in time to get a good look. Moreover, astronomers do not quite know exactly where they are coming from, or where the next one might land.

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Can Universities Control the Operation of Municipal Zoning Ordinances?

If you’re in a particular zoning district of Bloomington near Indiana University, the zoning ordinance gives you a limited number of permitted uses, and an even more limited number of permitted residential uses. One of those uses is “fraternity house/sorority house”, where the fraternity or sorority has to be “sanctioned or recognized . . . through whatever procedures Indiana University uses to render such a sanction or recognition”.
Every once in a while, a fraternity gets derecognized by the University.

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These Trumpy Billionaire Bros Are in Hot Seat Over Union-Busting Claims

A labor dispute of cartoonish proportions is playing out in Las Vegas, pitting two Trump-supporting casino billionaires against one of the largest private union drives in the country.
Brothers Frank and Lorenzo Fertitta have been ordered to testify about allegations that their gaming business, Station Casinos, egregiously tried to undercut labor organizing efforts. It is just the latest chapter in a complex saga that has played out for a decade. An administrative trial involving some of the claims is underway before a National Labor Relations Board judge.

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What Do We Talk About When We Talk About Viruses?

An army man surrounded by coronavirus particles. (Ezume Images / Shutterstock)

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Does equality make people happy?

Many politicians, journalists, and academics are obsessed with inequality. And they usually take it for granted that more equality equals more happiness. But does it? Jonathan Kelley and M.D.R. Evans of the University of Nevada took it upon themselves to investigate this question in a large-scale study published a few years ago. Their pool of data was remarkably extensive and included 169 representative surveys from 68 nations, in which a total of 211,578 people were surveyed.
On the one hand, the study drew on established questions from so-called “happiness research.

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New analysis reveals the secrets of Biden’s 2020 win

Joe Biden speaking with attendees at the Moving America Forward Forum hosted by United for Infrastructure at the Student Union at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas in Las Vegas, Nevada in 2020, Gage Skidmore

Overall participation in the 2020 election among U.S. adults rose 7 points from 2016 to reach 66% last year. A new analysis of validated voters from Pew Research Center (which provides a bigger, more reliable sample than exit polls) built on several of the 2020 trends that have already been reported.

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Idaho gubernatorial candidate Ammon Bundy is part of a broader far-right ‘anti-establishment’ trend: report

Ammon Bundy became infamous in 2014 when he was involved in an armed standoff with federal officials in Nevada, where his father, rancher Cliven Bundy, refused to pay grazing fees. The younger Bundy, also known for his armed occupation of federal land in Oregon, is now running for governor of Idaho as a Republican — and Washington Post reporter Paulina Villegas points to his campaign as part of a broader trend of far-right anti-establishment populism.

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Idaho gubernatorial candidate Ammon Bundy is part of a broader far-right ‘anti-establishment’ trend: report

One of the people interviewed for Villegas’ article was Jeffrey Lyons, an assistant political science professor at Boise State University in Idaho. Lyons believes that the same far-right forces driving Bundy’s gubernatorial campaign are driving far-right members of Congress such as Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene of Georgia and Rep. Lauren Boebert of Colorado.

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This stunning timelapse shows the megadrought’s toll on the West’s largest reservoir

Just how bad is the drought in the Western US? The shrinking of Lake Mead, the country’s largest reservoir, is a troubling indicator.
The massive man-made lake, which straddles the border of Arizona and Nevada, is now only at 39 percent of its full capacity, down from 44 percent in April 2020. That’s equivalent to a 10-foot drop in the water level, according to the latest data from the Bureau of Reclamation. Which means mandatory restrictions on the amount of water surrounding states draw from Lake Mead could be triggered in the next few months.

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This stunning timelapse shows the megadrought’s toll on the West’s largest reservoir

Just how bad is the drought in the Western US? The shrinking of Lake Mead, the country’s largest reservoir, is a troubling indicator.
The massive man-made lake, which straddles the border of Arizona and Nevada, is now only at 39 percent of its full capacity, down from 44 percent in April 2020. That’s equivalent to a 10-foot drop in the water level, according to the latest data from the Bureau of Reclamation. Which means mandatory restrictions on the amount of water surrounding states draw from Lake Mead could be triggered in the next few months.

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