48 Hours of Medieval Agriculture

I just finished mowing 10 acres of lawn. Okay, maybe it wasn’t 10 acres, but firstly, I’m a letters guy and I can’t count, and thirdly, I’m really tired. The chroniclers of yesteryear did funny things. I have journalist friends who have covered wars, traveled infiltrated among terrorists, or who still talk about teletypes, which is tantamount to receiving a Whatsapp and exclaiming that a telegram has arrived on your cell phone. Journalistic decadence leads us to this.

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It’s incredibly hard to know what you should pay for secondhand clothes

A vintage leather jacket is, in theory, an easy thing to find online. My weeks-long search, however, only led to an extended deliberation between three near-identical garments — all oxblood red, with a tieable belt — at three wildly different price points: $60, $125, and $250. I was conflicted. How could I make a sound decision when I wasn’t even sure what a secondhand jacket should cost?
“Choice overload,” as it’s called, is a natural product of capitalism.

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It’s incredibly hard to know what you should pay for secondhand clothes

A vintage leather jacket is, in theory, an easy thing to find online. My weeks-long search, however, only led to an extended deliberation between three near-identical garments — all oxblood red, with a tieable belt — at three wildly different price points: $60, $125, and $250. I was conflicted. How could I make a sound decision when I wasn’t even sure what a secondhand jacket should cost?
“Choice overload,” as it’s called, is a natural product of capitalism.

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Gen Z doesn’t know a world without fast fashion

Millions of Americans, specifically those born around or after the year 2000, have never inhabited a world without fast fashion. They became shoppers at the height of its boom: Retailers like ASOS drop at least 5,000 new styles a week, and Shein offers 700 to 1,000 new styles daily. And while these young shoppers are increasingly wary of the evils of fast fashion, they have little room to protest. They buy what’s available, and what’s available is generally fast.
This pace is a relatively modern innovation.

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Branding ACT UP

Imagine this: You’re a photo editor at a major newspaper. The year is 1991. Tomorrow, a story about a protest by the activist group ACT UP (AIDS Coalition To Unleash Power) is running in the paper, and you must select an image to illustrate it. You’re paid to know newsworthiness when you see it, so you scan the shots of the demonstration for the image most likely to catch your imagined reader’s attention. Which one will you choose?

LET THE RECORD SHOW: A Political History of ACT UP New York, 1987-1993
by Sarah Schulman
Buy on Bookshop
Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 736 pp, $40.00.

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How thrifting became problematic

Alli Vera has sold more than 2,600 articles of clothing on Depop since 2016. Her shop, Color Club, specializes in vintage styles from the 1970s through the early 2000s, and most of the garments are sourced from local thrift stores in Virginia, where she lives. In March, Vera decided to permanently close Color Club and leave behind her 83,000 Depop followers.
In a 28-minute video, Vera explained that she wanted to focus on growing her YouTube channel, since reselling had become “crazy time-consuming.

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How thrifting became problematic

Alli Vera has sold more than 2,600 articles of clothing on Depop since 2016. Her shop, Color Club, specializes in vintage styles from the 1970s through the early 2000s, and most of the garments are sourced from local thrift stores in Virginia, where she lives. In March, Vera decided to permanently close Color Club and leave behind her 83,000 Depop followers.
In a 28-minute video, Vera explained that she wanted to focus on growing her YouTube channel, since reselling had become “crazy time-consuming.

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The Cred of Streetwear Might be the Biggest Fashion Con of All

Even the celebrities who help inspire FOMO are not im­mune.
Speaking by phone, Lois Sakany, the editor of Snobette who has been covering streetwear trends for almost twenty years, pointed me to a social media pile-on involving Maisie Williams, the young Game of Thrones actress, who was photographed in 2016 wear­ing what certainly appeared to me to be a Supreme box logo T-shirt.
“But the kids who really followed Supreme immediately picked up on the fact that it was fake, that she had bought it… I don’t know, like a knockoff copy from wherever she bought it.

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The Cred of Streetwear Might be the Biggest Fashion Con of All

Even the celebrities who help inspire FOMO are not im­mune.
Speaking by phone, Lois Sakany, the editor of Snobette who has been covering streetwear trends for almost twenty years, pointed me to a social media pile-on involving Maisie Williams, the young Game of Thrones actress, who was photographed in 2016 wear­ing what certainly appeared to me to be a Supreme box logo T-shirt.
“But the kids who really followed Supreme immediately picked up on the fact that it was fake, that she had bought it… I don’t know, like a knockoff copy from wherever she bought it.

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